April 19: Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series featuring poet Maggie Smith

6:30pm – Margaret L. Boyce Recital Hall (Landini Center for Performing and Fine Arts)

Internationally acclaimed poet Maggie Smith will be reading at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 19 in the Landini Center for the Performing and Fine Arts, Margaret L. Boyce Recital Hall as part of the Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series. The reading will be followed by a question and answer session and a book signing.

Maggie Smith is the author of three books of poetry – Good Bones (Fall 2017); The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison [ISU Library PS3619.M5918 A6 2015], winner of the Dorset Prize and the 2016 Independent Publisher Book Awards Gold Medal in Poetry; and Lamp of the Body [ISU Library PS3619.M5918 L36 2005 ], winner of the Benjamin Saltman Award. She is also the author of three prizewinning chapbooks.

Smith’s poems have appeared in the many other journals and anthologies. Her poem “Good Bones” went viral internationally and was named the Official Poem of 2016” by the BBC/Public Radio International. In April 2017 “Good Bones” was featured on the CBS primetime drama Madam Secretary, and to date the poem has been translated into nearly a dozen languages.

Smith is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Sustainable Arts Foundation, among others.

This event is sponsored by the Indiana State University Center for Community Engagement and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Cordell Dictionary Collection acquires its oldest word book

The newest addition in the Cordell Collection at Cunningham Memorial Library is also its oldest.

Italian humanist Johannes Tortellius’ “De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum,” published in 1471, was purchased with funds from a special sesquicentennial event at Indiana State University in November. The event celebrated the university’s Cordell Collection and the Schick Lecture Series and featured Martha Barnette and Grant Barrett, co-hosts of “A Way with Words.” The popular National Public Radio show examines language through history, culture and family. All of the proceeds benefited the Cordell Collection’s purchase of a new dictionary.

Tortellius, who is largely known for his work with Pope Nicholas V and helping to establish the Vatican library, spent five years in Greece learning Greek in order to write this book, which documents Latin words of Greek origin and was completed in 1451.

The book was printed on the second press established in Rome and is now the oldest printed book in the Cordell Collection of Dictionaries. The collection’s next oldest printed piece was published in 1478.

“De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum” includes a short introduction to Greek spelling, pronunciation and syllabification. Each entry, which range in length from two lines to 24 pages, gives the word’s Greek and Latin pronunciations, definitions and its earliest appearance in Latin literature.

There are a couple of pages missing and, somewhere along the line, someone replaced the pages with ones from another edition, but the book has the original binding and is very typical of the time period,” said Cinda May, chair of Special Collections at Indiana State. “There is no title page, as was the practice in early printed books, and it has a wonderful illuminated page. It is a lovely example of a book of the incunable period (1454-1501), with the thin columns of text and wide margins that were intended for glossing. This book not only has the beautiful illumination, but also it has other fancy initials and details drawn in red and purple pen work. Like so many early books, this piece also has worm holes. Today, we say ‘bookworm’ and we mean someone who reads, but there really are bookworms.”

The text served as a pre-cursor for dictionaries and etymologies that followed, May added, making it a seminal work in its own right.

“It influenced Ambrogio Calepino, one of the earliest Italian lexicographers, and Thomas Elyot, whose 1538 dictionary set the template for Latin-English word books. These books were not really intended to be dictionaries like we think of today,” May said. “Instead, they were part of the tradition where knowledge was being rediscovered in the West and languages had to be learned again. That gave rise to dictionaries and etymologies when people were trying to figure it out again, so they could pass the learning and ability to read these languages and unlock the literary and nonfiction works of the Classical period.”

The Cordell Collection of Dictionaries began in 1969 with a gift of 453 English dictionaries to Indiana State from Warren and Suzanne Cordell. Warren Cordell, an Indiana State alumnus, continued to add to the collection over the years until his death in 1980. In total, he donated 3,232 editions and variants totaling 3,913 volumes. Today, the collection houses more than 30,000 volumes.

The collection includes in-depth, multiple editions of any work that is available and the latest piece helps fill in a gap in the collection’s early dictionary works.

“It wouldn’t have been possible for us to purchase the ‘De orthographia’ if it hadn’t been for the support of the attendees of the ‘A Way with Words’ fundraiser,” May said. “But now that it’s here, I think Mr. Cordell would be pleased that it is part of the collection.”

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Photos: https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Media-Services/Submitted-Photos/Staff-Uploads/i-JcGJKwX/0/3afd6b92/XL/Book%20open%201-XL.jpg – An image of an inside page of Italian humanist Johannes Tortellius’ “De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum,” which was published in 1471 and is the oldest and most recent purchase for the Cordell Collection at Indiana State University’s Cunningham Memorial Library. The text includes a short introduction to Greek spelling, pronunciation and syllabification. Each entry, which range in length from two lines to four pages, gives the word’s Greek and Latin pronunciations, definitions and its earliest appearance in Latin literature.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Media-Services/Submitted-Photos/Staff-Uploads/i-HNhsTBF/0/ad7e3eb6/X2/Flowerscroll-X2.jpg – An image of the illumination drawn throughout “De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum,” a dictionary by Italian humanist Johannes Tortellius. The text was published in 1471 and is the oldest and most recent purchase for the Cordell Collection at Indiana State University’s Cunningham Memorial Library. The text includes a short introduction to Greek spelling, pronunciation and syllabification. Each entry, which range in length from two lines to four pages, gives the word’s Greek and Latin pronunciations, definitions and its earliest appearance in Latin literature.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Media-Services/Submitted-Photos/Staff-Uploads/i-q3rPf4P/0/22d2a00b/X2/3-X2.jpg – An image of the red and violet ink etchings on the inside page of “De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum,” a dictionary by Italian humanist Johannes Tortellius. The text was published in 1471 and is the oldest and most recent purchase for the Cordell Collection at Indiana State University’s Cunningham Memorial Library. The text includes a short introduction to Greek spelling, pronunciation and syllabification. Each entry, which range in length from two lines to four pages, gives the word’s Greek and Latin pronunciations, definitions and its earliest appearance in Latin literature.

Contact: Cinda May, chair of Special Collections, Cunningham Memorial Library, Indiana State University, cinda.may@instate.edu or 812-237-2534

Writer: Betsy Simon, assistant director of media relations, Office of Communications and Marketing, Indiana State University, 812-237-7972 or betsy.simon@indstate.edu

[reported from http://www2.indstate.edu/news/news.php?newsid=5071]

February 28: 33rd Annual ISU Authors and Artists Program and Reception

The library’s annual Authors and Artists program is the only campus event that honors the written or artistic material or performance of State’s faculty. Staff and students. This year’s 33nd annual event will feature Indiana State University’s faculty and emeriti who published or created artistic works in 2017. A reception will begin at 2:30 p.m. with light refreshments, with the program beginning at 3 p.m. The occasion also serves as a place to recognize this year’s graduate and undergraduate recipients of the Library’s Bakerman Student Research Award.

 

Jan. 23: National HANDWRITING Day

Celebrate National Handwriting Day at Cunningham Memorial Library

DO you take notes on a laptop, or by hand? Studies of college-aged students show that writing by hand is a big benefit over typing notes into your laptop.

Did you know that your signature is unique?

Did you know that many bloggers and writers believe that writing by hand connects them to their emotions and inner self in a way that keyboards can’t?

National Handwriting Day is associated with Jan. 23 (John Hancock’s birthday), the man with the famously large signature on the Declaration of Independence, and to highlight the importance of writing by hand.

Stop by the library lobby to help celebrate this day with Theresa Ortega “The Handwriting Sensei”:

Ø  Get fun tips for writing more,

Ø  Learn why it’s better for you to write by hand,

Take a selfie with your own handwriting, share it and see efforts worldwide on social media for International Handwriting Week. Tuesday, Jan. 23 Cunningham Memorial Library Lobby 11:00am – 1:00pm

DOES THE LIBRARY HAVE BOOKS ON HANDWRITING? 

 

PRINT

  • BF891 .H814 Handwriting in psychological interpretations by Arthur G. Holt.
  • BF 891 .B833 1979 Handwriting analysis : the science of determining personality by graphoanalysis by M. N. Bunker.
  • BF891 .H814 Handwriting in psychological interpretations, by Arthur G. Holt.
  • BF891 .R69 The science of handwriting analysis; a guide to character and personality.
  • BF905 .C5S6 1978 Knowing your child through his handwriting and drawings by Shirl Solomon.
  • DA670.E7 A17 no.21 Examples of English handwriting, 1150-1750; with transcripts and translations. Grieve, Hilda E. P.
  • LB1576 .B487 2007 Best practices in writing instruction – edited by Steve Graham, Charles A. MacArthur, Jill Fitzgerald.
  • LB1536 .B85 Improving handwriting instruction in elementary schools.
  • LB1590 .L3 Handwriting : I. Instruction in handwriting in Ontario schools : II. Handwriting : an annotated bibliography – Stephen B. Lawton, principal investigator, A. Blaine Currie.
  • LB1590 .W4 Changing practice in handwriting instruction : suggestions and discussion based upon a survey of present practices and problems by Paul V. West.
  • PE1011 .S6 no.23 English handwriting, with thirty-four facsimile plates and artistic & paleographical criticisms by Roger Fry & E. A. Lowe.
  • PE1143 .N3 Research on handwriting and spelling; a research bulletin prepared by a committee of the National Conference on Research in English.
  • Z 40 .T46 1996 Handwriting in America : a cultural history by Tamara Plakins Thornton.
  • Z43 .H36 2000 Handwriting research and resources : a guide to curriculum planning.
  • Z43 .S6 Improve your handwriting.
  • Z43 .S7x Our handwriting, If you’re dissatisfied with the way you write and would like to do something about it, you may want to join the international group now studying the best writing manual known, published in 1522. Standard, Paul
  • Z113 .T17 The handwriting of the renaissance, Tannenbaum, Samuel Aaron
  • Z 40 .T46 1996 Reading early American handwriting by Kip Sperry.
  • Z43 .D264 Elizabethan handwriting, 1500-1650; a manual by Giles E. Dawson and Laetitia Kennedy-Skipton.
  • Special Collections – Reference Z115.A5 S64 1998 Reading early American handwriting / Kip Sperry.
  • Special Collections – Reference Z115.U5 K5 The handwriting of American records for a period of 300 years. By E. Kay Kirkham.
  • Special Collections – Reference Z42 .H25 1979s The signature of America : a fresh look at famous handwriting / by Charles Hamilton.

E-BOOKS

  • Marion Richardson : Her Life and Her Contribution to Handwriting / Sassoon, Rosemary.
  • Handwriting : the way to teach it / Rosemary Sassoon.
  • Imprint and Trace : Handwriting in the Age of Technology
  • Signature for success: how to analyze handwriting and improve your career, your relationships, and your life / Arlyn Imberman with June Rifkin.
  • Handwriting of the Twentieth Century
  • Handwriting problems in the secondary school
  • Sign here! : handwriting in the age of new media / edited by Sonja Neef, José Van Dijck, Eric Ketelaar.

CHILDREN’S BOOKS/EDUCATIONAL – PRINT

  • Cursive handwriting / by Jan Z. Olsen.
  • Zaner-Bloser handwriting : a way to self-expression / senior authors, Clinton S. Hackney, Virginia H. Lucas.
  • Italic handwriting & calligraphy for the beginner : a craft manual / Charles Lehman.
  • Interpreting handwriting / Jane Paterson.
  • Graphology : a guide to handwriting analysis / by Thomas G. Aylesworth.
  • Cursive success / by Jan Z. Olsen

CHILDREN’S BOOKS/EDUCATIONAL – E-BOOKS

  • Handwriting problems in the secondary school
  • Handwriting : the way to teach it

Oct. 18 Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series

Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series presents: Poet and alumnus Samuel T. Franklin

October 18, 2017 6:00 pm – Ends at: 7:00 pm

University Art Gallery (in the Landini Center for the Fine and Performing Arts)

Contact: Amy Ash 8122373168 amy.ash@indstate.edu

Franklin will read from his work 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18 in the University Art Gallery.

A question and answer session will follow. This event is free and open to the public, and is co-sponsored by the Indiana State University Center for Community Engagement and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Samuel T. Franklin holds an M.A. from Indiana State University. Currently working as a technical writer in Bloomington, Indiana, his poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Flying IslandThe Indianapolis Review, HoosierLit, and M Review, among others. The God of Happiness is his first book.

Contact: Amy Ash 8122373168 amy.ash@indstate.edu

Reprinted