April 25: Bash Lectures in Modern American Literature: Megan Marshall

James and Virginia Bash Lectures in Modern American Literature: Megan Marshall

The lecture series welcomes Megan Marshall, Charles Wesley Emerson College professor, to present “My Elizabeths: Confessions of a Serial Biographer” at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 25 in Root Hall, A-264.

She is the author of Margaret Fuller, for which she won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize, and of The Peabody Sisters, which won the Francis Parkman Prize and the Mark Lynton History Prize.

 

May 1: English Department’s Dreiser Visiting Writers Series welcomes Poet Lynn Melnick

Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series featuring Lynn Melnick

Poet Lynn Melnick will read for the writers series at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, May 1 in the Landini Center for the Performing and Fine Arts, University Art Gallery.

Lynn Melnick is the author of Landscape with Sex and Violence (YesYes Books, 2017) and If I Should Say I Have Hope (YesYes Books, 2012). She is a fellow at the New York Public Library’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers and serves on the Executive Board of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. [https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/lynn-melnick]

This event is free and open to the public.

This series was  established by the English Department in 2013.

PS: it’s National Poetry Month!

 

 

Feb. 27: Authors and Artists Recognition program and reception

The library’s annual Authors and Artists program is the only campus event that honors the written or artistic material or performance of ISU’s faculty, staff and students. This year’s 34th annual event will feature Indiana State University’s faculty and emeriti who published or created artistic works in 2018.

A reception will be held Wednesday, February 27, in the Library Events Area beginning at 2:30 p.m. with light refreshments. The program will begin at 3 p.m. Authors to be recognized this year:

  • Brad Balch (Building Great School Board-Superintendent Teams:  A Systematic Approach to Balancing Roles and Responsibilities),
  • Matthew Bergbower (A Profile of the American Electorate),
  • Ryan Donlan (The School Board Member’s Guidebook),
  • Amanda Hobson (Gender Warriors: Reading Contemporary Urban Fantasy (co-editor),
  • Malynnda Johnson (HIV on TV: popular culture’s epidemic)
  • David Nichols (Peoples of the Inland Sea: Native Americans and Newcomers in the Great Lakes Region, 1600-1870),
  • Robert Perrin (Pocket Guide to APA style (6th ed.),
  • Samory Rashid (The Islamist Challenge and Africa),
  • James Speer (Exposé on Climate Change),
  • Qihao Weng (3 publications: High Spatial Resolution Remote Sensing: Data, Analysis, and Applications; Remote Sensing Time Series Image Processing; Urban Remote Sensing (2nd ed).

Artists:

  • Chris Berchild (Projection Designer, Looking Over the President’s Shoulder, Indiana Repertory Theatre)
  • Michael Jackson (Lighting Designer, Romeo and Juliet, Indiana Repertory Theatre)

For more information on this and past programs, visit http://libguides.indstate.edu/AnnualEvents/AuthorsArtists

The occasion also serves as a place to recognize this year’s graduate and undergraduate recipients of the Library’s Bakerman Research Award.

This year the Library is recognizing Laura Harlow (Educational Leadership) for her  EDLR 687 (History of Higher Education in the U.S) paper: “February 25, 1960: Stories of Inspiration, Risk, and the Fight for Freedom”. Laura was nominated by Dr. Kandace Hinton. Undergraduate Colleen Madden (Honors College) will be recognized for her GH 401 (Honors Independent Study) paper “An Investigation of Body Image Among NCAA Female Athletes”. Colleen was nominated by Dr. Greg Bierly, Dean, Honors College.

Visit http://libguides.indstate.edu/AnnualEvents/Bakerman more information.

 

April 19: Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series featuring poet Maggie Smith

6:30pm – Margaret L. Boyce Recital Hall (Landini Center for Performing and Fine Arts)

Internationally acclaimed poet Maggie Smith will be reading at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 19 in the Landini Center for the Performing and Fine Arts, Margaret L. Boyce Recital Hall as part of the Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series. The reading will be followed by a question and answer session and a book signing.

Maggie Smith is the author of three books of poetry – Good Bones (Fall 2017); The Well Speaks of Its Own Poison [ISU Library PS3619.M5918 A6 2015], winner of the Dorset Prize and the 2016 Independent Publisher Book Awards Gold Medal in Poetry; and Lamp of the Body [ISU Library PS3619.M5918 L36 2005 ], winner of the Benjamin Saltman Award. She is also the author of three prizewinning chapbooks.

Smith’s poems have appeared in the many other journals and anthologies. Her poem “Good Bones” went viral internationally and was named the Official Poem of 2016” by the BBC/Public Radio International. In April 2017 “Good Bones” was featured on the CBS primetime drama Madam Secretary, and to date the poem has been translated into nearly a dozen languages.

Smith is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Sustainable Arts Foundation, among others.

This event is sponsored by the Indiana State University Center for Community Engagement and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Cordell Dictionary Collection acquires its oldest word book

The newest addition in the Cordell Collection at Cunningham Memorial Library is also its oldest.

Italian humanist Johannes Tortellius’ “De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum,” published in 1471, was purchased with funds from a special sesquicentennial event at Indiana State University in November. The event celebrated the university’s Cordell Collection and the Schick Lecture Series and featured Martha Barnette and Grant Barrett, co-hosts of “A Way with Words.” The popular National Public Radio show examines language through history, culture and family. All of the proceeds benefited the Cordell Collection’s purchase of a new dictionary.

Tortellius, who is largely known for his work with Pope Nicholas V and helping to establish the Vatican library, spent five years in Greece learning Greek in order to write this book, which documents Latin words of Greek origin and was completed in 1451.

The book was printed on the second press established in Rome and is now the oldest printed book in the Cordell Collection of Dictionaries. The collection’s next oldest printed piece was published in 1478.

“De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum” includes a short introduction to Greek spelling, pronunciation and syllabification. Each entry, which range in length from two lines to 24 pages, gives the word’s Greek and Latin pronunciations, definitions and its earliest appearance in Latin literature.

There are a couple of pages missing and, somewhere along the line, someone replaced the pages with ones from another edition, but the book has the original binding and is very typical of the time period,” said Cinda May, chair of Special Collections at Indiana State. “There is no title page, as was the practice in early printed books, and it has a wonderful illuminated page. It is a lovely example of a book of the incunable period (1454-1501), with the thin columns of text and wide margins that were intended for glossing. This book not only has the beautiful illumination, but also it has other fancy initials and details drawn in red and purple pen work. Like so many early books, this piece also has worm holes. Today, we say ‘bookworm’ and we mean someone who reads, but there really are bookworms.”

The text served as a pre-cursor for dictionaries and etymologies that followed, May added, making it a seminal work in its own right.

“It influenced Ambrogio Calepino, one of the earliest Italian lexicographers, and Thomas Elyot, whose 1538 dictionary set the template for Latin-English word books. These books were not really intended to be dictionaries like we think of today,” May said. “Instead, they were part of the tradition where knowledge was being rediscovered in the West and languages had to be learned again. That gave rise to dictionaries and etymologies when people were trying to figure it out again, so they could pass the learning and ability to read these languages and unlock the literary and nonfiction works of the Classical period.”

The Cordell Collection of Dictionaries began in 1969 with a gift of 453 English dictionaries to Indiana State from Warren and Suzanne Cordell. Warren Cordell, an Indiana State alumnus, continued to add to the collection over the years until his death in 1980. In total, he donated 3,232 editions and variants totaling 3,913 volumes. Today, the collection houses more than 30,000 volumes.

The collection includes in-depth, multiple editions of any work that is available and the latest piece helps fill in a gap in the collection’s early dictionary works.

“It wouldn’t have been possible for us to purchase the ‘De orthographia’ if it hadn’t been for the support of the attendees of the ‘A Way with Words’ fundraiser,” May said. “But now that it’s here, I think Mr. Cordell would be pleased that it is part of the collection.”

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Photos: https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Media-Services/Submitted-Photos/Staff-Uploads/i-JcGJKwX/0/3afd6b92/XL/Book%20open%201-XL.jpg – An image of an inside page of Italian humanist Johannes Tortellius’ “De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum,” which was published in 1471 and is the oldest and most recent purchase for the Cordell Collection at Indiana State University’s Cunningham Memorial Library. The text includes a short introduction to Greek spelling, pronunciation and syllabification. Each entry, which range in length from two lines to four pages, gives the word’s Greek and Latin pronunciations, definitions and its earliest appearance in Latin literature.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Media-Services/Submitted-Photos/Staff-Uploads/i-HNhsTBF/0/ad7e3eb6/X2/Flowerscroll-X2.jpg – An image of the illumination drawn throughout “De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum,” a dictionary by Italian humanist Johannes Tortellius. The text was published in 1471 and is the oldest and most recent purchase for the Cordell Collection at Indiana State University’s Cunningham Memorial Library. The text includes a short introduction to Greek spelling, pronunciation and syllabification. Each entry, which range in length from two lines to four pages, gives the word’s Greek and Latin pronunciations, definitions and its earliest appearance in Latin literature.

https://photos.smugmug.com/Other/Media-Services/Submitted-Photos/Staff-Uploads/i-q3rPf4P/0/22d2a00b/X2/3-X2.jpg – An image of the red and violet ink etchings on the inside page of “De orthographia dictionum e Graecis tractarum,” a dictionary by Italian humanist Johannes Tortellius. The text was published in 1471 and is the oldest and most recent purchase for the Cordell Collection at Indiana State University’s Cunningham Memorial Library. The text includes a short introduction to Greek spelling, pronunciation and syllabification. Each entry, which range in length from two lines to four pages, gives the word’s Greek and Latin pronunciations, definitions and its earliest appearance in Latin literature.

Contact: Cinda May, chair of Special Collections, Cunningham Memorial Library, Indiana State University, cinda.may@instate.edu or 812-237-2534

Writer: Betsy Simon, assistant director of media relations, Office of Communications and Marketing, Indiana State University, 812-237-7972 or betsy.simon@indstate.edu

[reported from http://www2.indstate.edu/news/news.php?newsid=5071]