Condemning Racism & Violence: Libraries Respond

Library Dean Robin Crumrin to ISU Library staff, Tuesday, August 15, 2017 12:42pm:

Our students are returning next week. The reprehensible events in Charlottesville, Virginia may be a part of the conversations they will want to have with faculty and staff. The statement I am including from Jim Neal, American Library Association President, represents my feelings on those inexcusable events. As Jim says, as a library community, ‘we must continue to support the creation of a more equitable, diverse and inclusive society.’ I am proud to be part of that library community.

STATEMENT FROM ALA PRESIDENT, JIM NEAL:

Dear Members:
The American Library Association expresses our deepest condolences to the families and friends of those lost and injured during this weekend’s protests in Charlottesville, Virginia. We will not forget their efforts to enlighten and safeguard their communities from bigotry while opposing racist, anti-immigrant, anti-GLBTQ, and anti-Semitic violence. We stand in solidarity with the people of Virginia as well as anyone who protests hate and fights for equity, diversity and inclusion.

The vile and racist actions and messages of the white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups in Charlottesville are in stark opposition to the ALA’s core values. No matter the venue or the circumstance, we condemn any form of intimidation or discrimination based on culture, ethnicity, gender, nationality, race, religion, or sexual orientation. Our differences should be celebrated, and mutual respect and understanding should serve as the norms within our society.

The ALA supports voices of hope as such actions mirror the library community’s efforts to abolish bigotry and cultural invisibility. As we recently stated, ‘we must continue to support the creation of a more equitable, diverse and inclusive society,’ and we will do this through the work of our members and through resources such as Libraries Respond. *

*The ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services has created Libraries Respond as a space for us to help keep current events in conversation with libraries’ ongoing work in and commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion. This page will be a resource for the library community to share information, find resources, and connect as they serve their communities.

Link to ALA statement above  [with additional links to resources and organizations within ALA]

April 18 & 19: Erase the Hate event

Library entrance area [near the blue wall]:

  • April 18: 2pm-4pm
  • April 19: 11-12:30 & 2-4

The College of Health and Human Services Inclusive Excellence Task Force is hosting an Erase the Hate event.

This interactive event will allow participants (students, faculty, staff, and administrators) to identify common negative stereotypes they have about different topics (e.g., religion, race, disability status, gender) and discuss mechanisms for replacing those negative stereotypes with positive aspects about each topic.

Participants will express their opinions on white paper (4’ x 6’) via markers. The topics will be provided on the paper by members of the Task Force.

Wed. April 13: “Race as Species: Animals and Other Asian Americans in Multicultural Children’s Literature” [Bash Lectures in Modern American Literature]

The Department of English will host the second Bash Lectures in Modern American Literature on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. April 13, in Root Hall A264. Professor Leslie Bow, University of Wisconsin, Madison, will present “Race as Species: Animals and Other Asian Americans in Multicultural Children’s Literature.”

Bow is the author of Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion: Feminism, Sexual Politics, Asian American Women’s Literature (Princeton UP, 2001) and “Partly Colored”: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South (New York UP, 2010), as well as the editor of The Scent of the Gods by Fiona Cheong U of Illinois P, 2010 and Asian American Feminisms, Volumes I-IV (Routledge, 2012). Winner of a National Endowment for the Humanities Award 2001, Bow is also Mark and Elisabeth Eccles Professor 2012-2017 and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor.

Mon. April 3: Jennifer Hart on “A New Accra for a Better Ghana?: Lessons on the Limits of ‘Global’ Narrative

TODAY at 4pm  Dr. Jennifer Hart, Wayne State University will present on “A New Accra for a Better Ghana?: Lessons on the Limits of ‘Global’ Narratives” at 4 p.m. Monday, April 3 in the Cunningham Memorial Library events area

Web: ghanaonthego.com | Social: @accramobile

Jennifer Hart has been doing research in Accra (Ghana) and London for the last ten years. She interested in the everyday lived experiences of Africans, and the varied ways the mundane of everyday life intersects with 20thcentury liberal ideals (development, citizenship, modernization, democracy, etc.).

Jennifer’s book, Ghana on the Go!: African Mobility in the Age of Motor Transportation, traces how different groups of Ghanaians shaped a distinct culture of automobility that reflected both the influence of foreign technological cultures and the socioeconomic priorities of African residents throughout the 20th century. She argues that early African appropriation of motor transportation technology and its subsequent expansion as an important economic sector, both as a niche for African entrepreneurs and as a primary mode of public transportation for both passengers and goods, allowed Africans in the Gold Coast/Ghana to have greater role in defining what autonomy meant and how it was exercised in the 20th century.

Hart is currently developing a digital humanities component of this project, called “Accra Mobile: Mapping Mobility, Culture and History in Contemporary Ghana,” which will provide an interactive online map of the public transport system in Accra, tracing the routes of informal trotros (or mini-buses) and documenting the sights, sounds, and visual and oral histories of Ghana’s transport scene on a publicly-accessible website. Her second project is a social and cultural history of late-colonial and postcolonial Accra. This project uses archival research, material culture, popular culture, and oral histories to trace the ways in which the politics of urban planning and the development of urban culture were influenced by (and influenced) the emergence of the Accra metropolitan area as a center of national and international attention and interaction. Her interest in Africa also extends beyond research. Jennifer is also involved in debates about contemporary African politics and development, as well as religion, music, art, and performance across the continent. [source: http://www.clas.wayne.edu/jennifer-hart4]