Contemporary French Film Festival Begins September 18

The Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics were awarded a grant, from the French government for this contemporary French cinema festival.  Each film will have also have a speaker.  Tournees Film Festival is made possible by Centre National du Cinéma et de L’image animée, Franco-American Cultural Fund, French Embassy in the United States: Higher Education Arts French Language and Highbrow.  Films subtitled in English. FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

9/18/2017 – Dernières nouvelles du Cosmos –  Tournées Film Festival (6:00pm – 8pm) in the Library Events Area

Can a person incapable of speaking or writing somehow produce beautiful literature?  In Latest News From the Cosmos (Derniere nouvelles du cosmos), director Julie Bertuccelli answers that question in the affirmative, documenting the remarkable story of Helene Nicolas, aka Babouillec, a severely autistic 30-year-old French woman who manages to convey her deepest inner thoughts through a unique form of poetic wordplay. Both inspirational and informative, this touching creative portrait received a small theatrical release in France and should find additional bookings on the fest circuit, with possibilities for screenings at educational and institutional outfits.

[description courtesy from http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/latest-news-cosmos-dernieres-nouvelles-du-cosmos-review-945722]

Condemning Racism & Violence: Libraries Respond

Library Dean Robin Crumrin to ISU Library staff, Tuesday, August 15, 2017 12:42pm:

Our students are returning next week. The reprehensible events in Charlottesville, Virginia may be a part of the conversations they will want to have with faculty and staff. The statement I am including from Jim Neal, American Library Association President, represents my feelings on those inexcusable events. As Jim says, as a library community, ‘we must continue to support the creation of a more equitable, diverse and inclusive society.’ I am proud to be part of that library community.

STATEMENT FROM ALA PRESIDENT, JIM NEAL:

Dear Members:
The American Library Association expresses our deepest condolences to the families and friends of those lost and injured during this weekend’s protests in Charlottesville, Virginia. We will not forget their efforts to enlighten and safeguard their communities from bigotry while opposing racist, anti-immigrant, anti-GLBTQ, and anti-Semitic violence. We stand in solidarity with the people of Virginia as well as anyone who protests hate and fights for equity, diversity and inclusion.

The vile and racist actions and messages of the white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups in Charlottesville are in stark opposition to the ALA’s core values. No matter the venue or the circumstance, we condemn any form of intimidation or discrimination based on culture, ethnicity, gender, nationality, race, religion, or sexual orientation. Our differences should be celebrated, and mutual respect and understanding should serve as the norms within our society.

The ALA supports voices of hope as such actions mirror the library community’s efforts to abolish bigotry and cultural invisibility. As we recently stated, ‘we must continue to support the creation of a more equitable, diverse and inclusive society,’ and we will do this through the work of our members and through resources such as Libraries Respond. *

*The ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services has created Libraries Respond as a space for us to help keep current events in conversation with libraries’ ongoing work in and commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion. This page will be a resource for the library community to share information, find resources, and connect as they serve their communities.

Link to ALA statement above  [with additional links to resources and organizations within ALA]

April 18 & 19: Erase the Hate event

Library entrance area [near the blue wall]:

  • April 18: 2pm-4pm
  • April 19: 11-12:30 & 2-4

The College of Health and Human Services Inclusive Excellence Task Force is hosting an Erase the Hate event.

This interactive event will allow participants (students, faculty, staff, and administrators) to identify common negative stereotypes they have about different topics (e.g., religion, race, disability status, gender) and discuss mechanisms for replacing those negative stereotypes with positive aspects about each topic.

Participants will express their opinions on white paper (4’ x 6’) via markers. The topics will be provided on the paper by members of the Task Force.

Wed. April 13: “Race as Species: Animals and Other Asian Americans in Multicultural Children’s Literature” [Bash Lectures in Modern American Literature]

The Department of English will host the second Bash Lectures in Modern American Literature on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. April 13, in Root Hall A264. Professor Leslie Bow, University of Wisconsin, Madison, will present “Race as Species: Animals and Other Asian Americans in Multicultural Children’s Literature.”

Bow is the author of Betrayal and Other Acts of Subversion: Feminism, Sexual Politics, Asian American Women’s Literature (Princeton UP, 2001) and “Partly Colored”: Asian Americans and Racial Anomaly in the Segregated South (New York UP, 2010), as well as the editor of The Scent of the Gods by Fiona Cheong U of Illinois P, 2010 and Asian American Feminisms, Volumes I-IV (Routledge, 2012). Winner of a National Endowment for the Humanities Award 2001, Bow is also Mark and Elisabeth Eccles Professor 2012-2017 and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor.