Hoosier Family of Readers initiative – fantastic digital reading for all Hoosiers!

Hoosier Family of Readers

Through the Hoosier Family of Readers initiative, students and their families across the state will have unlimited access to reading material on myON, giving families an opportunity to share rich literacy experiences together regardless of their socioeconomic status or whether or not there is a proficient reader in the home.

  • More than 3,000 digital books from Capstone and additional publishing partners, ranging from illustrated and picture books to chapter books, graphic novels, literary non-fiction, photo and informational texts spanning multiple eras and cultures.
  • Digital books from the following publishing partners will also be available: August House Little Folk/ Story Cove, Bellwether, Hothouse, Mikaya Press, Orca, ReferencePoint, Saddleback and Sylvan-Dell.
  • The collection includes 70% nonfiction, 10% Spanish or dual language and 20% Hi-Lo titles, and is continually growing.
  • A wide range of titles and topics provides varying levels of text complexity and support close reading in a range of genres and content areas, including history/social studies, science and technical works.
  • Books are available online anytime, anywhere students have access to an Internet connection, 24×7,
  • There’s no limit to the number of students who can read the same book at the same time on myON.
  • Students can download up to 20 titles for offline reading using free mobile apps for iPad and Android devices.

For more information:  http://www.doe.in.gov/improvement/myon-books

This site will tell you how to login and has screen shots to help you figure out navigation.

>>If you want to go to the actual site, go here: http://www.myon.com/login/Hoosier/
you have to enter:

  • School Name: Hoosier Family of Readers, Indiana Department of Education
  • Username: read
  • Password: read

Research shows students perform well regardless of reading print or digital books

UPDATE: WTHI-TV did a story that aired on May 8, and included some footage in the library and some words from Reference/Instruction Librarian Steve Hardin.

Research by an Indiana State University doctoral student found that students did equally well on a test whether reading from a digital book or a printed one.

Jim Johnson, who also is director of instructional and information technology services in the Bayh College of Education, surveyed more than 200 students. Half of the students used an iPad2 to read a textbook chapter while the other half of the students read from a printed textbook chapter. The students then took an open-book quiz with eight easy and eight moderate questions on the chapter.

“Few people have done a lot of research into what I’m doing,” Johnson said. “Mine directly ties performance with perception by undergraduates.”

Johnson’s research specifically examined three questions:

  1. Are there any significant differences in reading comprehension test scores of students when using paper texts versus digital texts?
  2. Are there any differences in reading comprehension test scores with regard to gender or between text formats and gender?
  3. Is there a relationship between the hours of experience using tablet computers and reading comprehension test scores among study participants?

“No matter what the format, no matter what the preference, they did well,” he said. “It was interesting that the gender didn’t matter on the test scores.”

Men had a mean score of 12.87 out of 16 while women had an average score of 13.60 out of 16. Students age 21 had an average score of 13.87 out of 16 while students 25 and older had an average score of 13.5 out of 16.

He also found that there was no significant difference on test scores whether or not the participant had past experience on a tablet. “The delivery method didn’t make any difference,” he said.

Of the participants, 88% said they had read books on laptops, netbooks or desktops while 51 percent said they had used an iPad, iPhone or iPod to read books. Additionally 36.1 % said they used a cell phone to look at digital texts. When asked what they would like to use, 69.1 %s aid they would want to use an iPad, iPhone or iPod to read digital text and almost the same amount, 68.7 %, said they would prefer a laptop, netbook or desktop computer. Only 48.1 % said they would want to use an e-book reader. In considering digital textbook readers, 74.7 % said the ability to browse the Internet was important while 70.4 said they wanted to read email, 62.7 % said cheapest price was important. Of the prices students said they would pay, 40 % said between $100 and $200 while 16.7 % said they would pay between $200 and $249.

“The bulk of undergraduate students are looking at cheaper devices. That’s important for students,” he said. “The market is driving our students to Android devices like Kindle.”

However, some problems remain in the digital textbook market. Students expressed concern about eye strain from reading text on electronic devices. Johnson said one participant became so nauseous reading the digital text that she was unable to complete the study. Also students expressed concern about the high price of digital textbooks as well as the battery life, software and reliable technology.

In focus groups after the initial test, Johnson said students didn’t like the high cost of digital book rental or the inability to resell digital textbooks. “A lot of the students didn’t like the idea of renting books,” he said.

Johnson said there needs to be further discussion about the cost of digital textbooks and how to keep costs down. Faculty members also need to be encouraged to write and create their own digital textbooks and resources for students, he said. Digital texts would allow professors to use the most current resources.

“Publishing on paper is always slower,” he said. “Delivery options for students are important. Information should be on demand.”

In the future, Johnson said professors could select chapters from different digital textbooks and combine it into one digital textbook so students wouldn’t have to buy different textbooks to read chapters that the professors like.

Contact: Jim Johnson, Indiana State University, director of instructional and information technology services with the Bayh College of Education, at Jim.Johnson@indstate.edu or 812-237-2921

Writer: Jennifer Sicking, Indiana State University, associate director of media relations, at Jennifer.Sicking@indstate.edu or 812-237-7972


Webinar: April 16 Introduction to Digital Preservation Webinar Series #3

4/16/2013, Introduction to Digital Preservation Webinar Series #3,  (11:00. to 12:00) Room 028

“Management of Incoming Born-Digital Special Collections;” Speaker  Gretchen Gueguen, University of Virginia.  Sponsored by the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL).

This webinar will cover the basics of getting started with managing born-digital archives. Through basic techniques and practical suggestions, you will learn how to assess your collection, develop a management plan, put basic policies in place, and set up an accessioning workflow. Simple tools to help you do the job will be reviewed along with guides and other resources to help answer your questions.

Webinar – April 9: Introduction to Digital Preservation Webinar Series #2

4/9/2013 – Introduction to Digital Preservation Webinar Series #2 (11:00 to noon) Room 230

“Forbearing the Digital Dark Age: Capturing Metadata for Digital Objects;” Speaker  Chris Dietrich, National Park Service. Sponsored by the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries (ASERL).

Metadata is the key to both discovery and long-term accessibility of digital content. This webinar will address metadata for digital photos, documents, audio-video, tabular data, and GIS data. Topics include categories of metadata, metadata standards for different asset types, metadata capture strategies, and metadata software tools. Links to additional resources for digital preservationists will also be provided.

Science Direct PPV currently unavailable

Science Direct PPV is currently unavailable. We have identified the issue, and have contacted Elsevier to correct it. However, their main office is on the East Coast.  We will update the blog as soon as we have confirmation of the fix.
3PM UPDATE: Science Direct PPV will be available again tomorrow morning.