April 26: “Let’s talk about HPV”: documentary screening and Q & A

5:30 pm-8:00 pm

Cunningham Memorial Library Events Area – Light refreshments will be served.

“Someone You Love: The HPV Epidemic” this film could save your life or someone you love. This award-winning documentary takes a look into the lives of five brave women affected by HPV.  Their stories portray the misconceptions, stigma, shame, heartbreak, pain, and triumph that they experience while battling cervical cancer.

A panel discussion and Q & A follow the screening.

This event is sponsored by the Department of Applied Health Sciences, Cunningham Memorial Library and the Center for Community Engagement.

Contact:  Aimee Janssen-Robinson – 812-237-9061 – aimee.janssen-robinson@indstate.edu

Trailer ~ Synopsis

April 18 & 19: Erase the Hate event

Library entrance area [near the blue wall]:

  • April 18: 2pm-4pm
  • April 19: 11-12:30 & 2-4

The College of Health and Human Services Inclusive Excellence Task Force is hosting an Erase the Hate event.

This interactive event will allow participants (students, faculty, staff, and administrators) to identify common negative stereotypes they have about different topics (e.g., religion, race, disability status, gender) and discuss mechanisms for replacing those negative stereotypes with positive aspects about each topic.

Participants will express their opinions on white paper (4’ x 6’) via markers. The topics will be provided on the paper by members of the Task Force.

April 18: Dr. Marisa Korody on The Frozen Zoo

Library Events Area, 7pm, April 18

ISU Alum Dr. Marisa Korody (GR 2006’, Ph.D, ’13) will discuss her Northern White Rhino Stem Cell Project.

Dr. Korody serves San Diego Zoo Global as a Postdoctoral Associate in Conservation Genetics.

From Tribune-Star article, April 13:

“It’s always great when alumni come back to ISU to talk about what they are up to now. It shows our current students what you can achieve with an ISU degree,” said Rusty Gonser, professor of biology and director of Indiana State’s Center for Genomic Advocacy. “Marisa is on the cutting edge of conservation biology. The Frozen Zoo and the northern white rhino stem cell project are in itself interesting in combating loss of diversity, as we are now in the sixth global extinction of animal species on the planet.”

During her time as a student, Korody was able to work on a similar project with white-throated sparrow project at State — an experience that inspired Korody to seek a career with San Diego Zoo Global.

The sparrow project focused on differences in the behavior and genetics of the white-throated sparrow. This polymorphic species has chromosomal differences that are linked to behavioral differences, allowing her to examine the genetic basis for aggression, song and promiscuity.

ISU was a good fit for me. I enjoyed the smaller campus, classes and biology department,” Korody said. “I wouldn’t have had nearly as good of an experience at a larger school where I would have been lost in the crowd or only saw my advisor once a quarter.”

Korody and a team of biologists are working on a project called The Frozen Zoo, which is a collection of living cells that have been cryopreserved in suspended animation.

They have preserved the cell lines from about 10,000 individuals and more than 900 species and sub species. The goal is to save as much genetic diversity from animals now before they are so endangered that they have lost that variability.

Korody’s latest mission has been to use their findings from The Frozen Zoo in their preservation of the northern white rhino. The team is exploring alternatives, such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer to develop northern white rhino embryos and implant them in female southern white rhinos at the San Diego Zoo. All of this can be achieved with the help of the DNA stored in The Frozen Zoo.

 The San Diego Zoo Safari Park is the world’s leader in white rhino breeding. However, the zoo population is no longer self-sustaining because of limited reproduction in females born at the institution and others around the globe.

Korody continues her research with the rhinos as well as the collection of DNA, blood and tissue samples of thousands of animals. These samples are valuable assets for researchers worldwide and also can be used for assisted reproduction of these organisms.

When Korody is not in the lab as a researcher, she is sharing her wealth of knowledge with other researchers and educators so that others can benefit from her work.

“We also hold workshops to teach our techniques to other researchers. The goal is to have other scientists starting their own biobanks around the world. There are species going extinct all the time, and we need to save as many as possible. By sharing our techniques with others we hope that many more species will be saved.”

Korody continues to expand her knowledge to best serve those around her. “You will never know everything, learning that and not being afraid to ask questions is important for success later.”

Story link 1 – Story link 2

April 18: Celebrate EARTH DAY – The Science of Climate Change: A Public Lecture by Amanda Shepherd

 

9:30-10:45 in Library Events Area

Climate economists have described Climate Change as “The Mother of All Externalities.”  Shifts in global ecosystems resulting from the industrialization of human economies will affect virtually all of humanity and will require broad international policy cooperation if we are to avoid their worst potential consequences.  It is both extremely complex and extremely controversial.

Amanda Shepherd is well qualified to present a public lecture on the science of Climate Change.  She graduated from the Department of Earth and Environmental Systems at Indiana State University, earning both Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in geology.   Her research experience includes studies in paleooceanography and paloeclimatology.

Amanda is the Hoosier Environmental Council’s Outreach Coordinator. She leads HEC’s efforts at engaging grassroots volunteers and building grasstops contacts in order to build the organization’s ability to better the lives of people, animals, and the environment in Indiana. Amanda develops multi-platform educational materials, researches information regarding legislative districts across the state, heads HEC’s Greening Your Community Initiative, and manages our Environmental Advocate volunteer program. Amanda’s professional experience includes work in the private sector, teaching, and scientific research. Her voluntary work includes serving as a regional coordinator for Sustainable Indiana 2016 and advancing a unique grassroots effort around climate change. Amanda has a B.S. and M.S in geology from Indiana State University, where she performed research in the fields of paleoceanography and paleoclimatology.

Amanda is reachable at ashepherd@hecweb.org and (317) 685-8800, ext. 109

Ms. Shepherd’s visit to Indiana State University is sponsored by the Hoosier Environmental Council, the Indiana State University Department of Economics and Cunningham Memorial Library.

[info reprinted from ISU News]