Special Collections Highlights Debs Collection (September 28)

Special Collections staffer, Dennis Vetrovec, and visitor, Cathy McGuire

On Saturday September 28, the Debs Foundation sponsored numerous events leading up to the Debs Award Dinner. This included special Saturday access to Special Collections’ Debs Collection.  Special Collections staffer Dennis Vetrovec chose many unique items from the Collection to display and staffed the open hours from 1pm – 4pm. Based on the reaction of the many people who took advantage of this opportunity, he chose well. People from all around the U.S. (California, North Dakota, Illinois, etc.) spent time poring over materials that included:

  • Photographs
  • Editorial Cartoons
  • Records from the National Archives, including court cases
  • Postcards
  • Correspondence
  • Proceedings of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen
  • Magazine of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen (Debs was a contributor and editor)
  • Manuscript of BLF membership written by Debs in part
  • Journals contemporary with the creation of the Debs Foundation
  • Leftist newspapers like the Appeal to Reason and clippings

middle: Michelle Morahn, Kate Debs researcher and Debs Foundation Secretary

In addition, two cases focused on Seymour Stedman, Debs’ lawyer and running mate, and David Karsner, Debs’ contemporary biographer.

Debs Collection materials displayed in the Cordell Dictionary Room

“Fight for $15” featured at Debs Foundation event (September 28)

Neal Bisno at the podium; Foundation President Noel Beasley and Betty Douglas at the table

On Saturday September 28, the Debs Foundation sponsored numerous events leading up to the Debs Award Dinner. One event was held in the Library Events Area: the Debs Award winner, Mary Kay Edwards, International President of the Service Employees International Union {SEIU}, was scheduled to speak about the “Fight for $15” movement (to raise minimum wage to $15). Unfortunately due to illness, she was unable to travel to Terre Haute. In her place, speakers from the movement presented information, a short video, and hosted a q/a session: Betty Douglas, a 61-year-old mother of three and McDonald’s employee and now activist and Neal Bisno, Executive Vice-President of the SEIU, along with Debs Foundation President Noel Beasley

Neal Bisno at the podium
Audience attending “Fight for $15”; Foundation President, Noel Beasley at the podium
Audience watching video on “Fight for $15”

LARRY BIRD SPOTTED ON LIBRARY’S 3RD FLOOR!

Larry Bird – as far as the eye can see!

A 13-case display of Larry Bird’s golden years at Indiana State University is now on display. In addition to photographs and magazines held by Archives, the exhibit is enhanced with personal memorabilia, including buttons, tickets and tee-shirts – are on loan from Al Perone. Al (’81 GR ’84) is known to everyone on the ISU campus. Currently he is serving as Assistant Director, Indiana State University Alumni Association in the Division of University Advancement.


Al on Larry: Being a student at Indiana State during the Larry Bird Era hooked me into Sycamore sports.  I was always a sports fan in HS, but when I came to ISU we were on the National stage.  When we made it to the Final Four in Salt Lake City Utah, there was no doubt in my mind that I wanted to be there!   A week later and 33 hours in the back seat of a Datsun B210, I was there.  I was able to witness “The Game that Made the Game.”    I feel very fortunate to be one of the few students in the world that was able to watch, in person, their school play for the National Title in Basketball!  Since then I’ve traveled over 50,000 miles watching Sycamore Teams play across the United States.  Go Trees!


 

July 15: Come to webcast celebrating Apollo 11 50th Anniversary

Celebrate Humanity’s First Step Onto Another World

 Many media events are scheduled this week to commemorate the Apollo 11 Moon Landing. On July 15, from 4:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. the Library will host a Live Webcast Event from the American Museum of Natural History and STAR Library Network. Watch the 4pm – 5pm webcast from our 3 screens in the Library Events Area (light refreshments), then linger to chat (event ends at 6pm). Our guides will help answer these questions: What was the sequence of this incredible mission? Where on the Moon did they land? And how did they return safely to Earth?

 It is hard to overstate the impact of Apollo 11’s first landing on the Moon.  It was humanity’s first step onto another world, an exciting climax to the space race, and the world’s largest rocket at the time.  It was a classic story of American ingenuity — leaving our home planet a mere one hundred years after connecting the transcontinental railroad, and only sixty-six years after the Wright Brothers’ first powered flight.

 The featured presenter is Dr. Carter Emmart, Director of Astrovisualization at  the American Museum of Natural History, where he directs  the award winning space show productions based in data  visualization that play in the Hayden Planetarium, and  around the world.  Since 1998 he has overseen the development of the interactive Digital Universe 3D Atlas. Starting in 2002, he began a collaboration with Sweden’s Linkoping  University hosting a series of masters thesis projects that  lead to the NASA supported freely available OpenSpace  software at openspaceproject.com. Carter’s career began as  a space artist, with an academic background in astronomy  and geophysics, and comes from a family tradition in the arts.

Library Represented at International Conference

Natalie Bulick and Susan Frey recently presented a scientific poster, An ethnography of student behavior in secluded and open spaces: Preliminary findings and implications for library space planning, at the 2019 International Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries conference (QQML). 

Attendees assembling for the Opening Ceremony of QQML 2019, held in what had been the monks’ refectory (dining room) of the Badia Fiesolana (EUI)

Natalie and Susan’s poster can be viewed at ISU’s Sycamore Scholars. 

Abstract: The design of physical space in academic libraries has become an increasingly important focus of concern in serving the diverse needs of contemporary student populations. Responding to trends that shift the focus of library space away from collections-centered to more user-centered design, many are exploring ways of creating a better library user experience. To achieve this aim, valuable research has been conducted by directly asking students to articulate their wants and needs via surveys, and in some cases, interviews. However, little research has been devoted to the systematic field observation of how students’ use library spaces. Even less of this research has synthesized data findings with robust theoretical frameworks. This poster details the preliminary findings of an ethnographic study at a four-year, public university. Researchers designed a protocol to observe students in freely available secluded and non-secluded library spaces to examine behavior, communication, and social interaction within the context of proxemics theory. The anthropological study of proxemics is useful in evaluating how people behave within immediate organizations of space, and has been successfully applied to the design of public and semi-public spaces. Attendees will learn of study findings, and how these data can be applied to practical applications such as furniture composition and layout, lighting, and general space planning. Also addressed are details of the next phase of this study. Keywords: Space/Buildings; Organizational Change; Proxemics [from page 189 of the conference proceedings.

View of Florence from a second story window of the EUI. If you look carefully you can see the Duomo on the left

QQML, a division of the nonprofit International Society for the Advancement of Science and Technology, promotes the theory and practice of research in libraries, museums, and archives.  This year the European University Institute (EUI) in Italy hosted the conference.  The EUI is an international postgraduate and post-doctoral teaching and research institution established by the European Union (EU) and serves as the official archive of the EU.

                            One of several rooms exhibiting the conference posters

It is located at the Badia Fiesolana complex, a former monastery established in the 10th century and situated on the Tuscan hillside overlooking the city of Florence (see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-bFgcQLhPU).

For this year’s conference over 300 social scientists and librarians from 62 countries assembled at the EUI for 5 days to discuss topics related to information culture and science. The QQML conference is hosted in a different country every year. The official language of the QQML is English.

The old monks’ cloister, which was used by conference attendees each mid-morning to take coffee breaks