April 13: Poetry with Environmental Themes

Special event for the ICS seminar this week- A poetry reading

 

April 13, 2016 –  12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Hulman Memorial Student Union, Room 316

Info: Eric Anderson – 812-237-8052 – eanderson@indstate.edu

A poetry reading and slide show of work that includes environmental and conservation themes will be put on by students and faculty from noon-1 p.m. Wednesday, April 13 in Hulman Memorial Student Union, Room 316.

This event is a departure from the usual more academic seminars that have been held weekly for the Institute for Community Sustainability seminar series this term. The public and students in particular are invited.

Feb. 3: Librarian Presents at Weekly Institute for Community Sustainability seminar

Starts at: 12:00 pm Ends at: 1:00 pm Where: HMSU 307

The third seminar for the ICS seminar season will be given by Steve Hardin, associate librarian.

The title is “Don’t stop with Google: Finding sustainability information.” Steve is the library’s liaison for the Communication, Earth and Environmental Systems, Math and Computer Science and the Political Science departments and is therefore well equipped to assist with library research on almost any topic that has to do with sustainable development.

More info? Contact:
Eric Anderson
812-237-8052
eanderson@indstate.edu

April 21: 8th Annual Earth Day: “The Honorable Harvest: Indigenous knowledge and conservation”

EVENT CANCELED; SPEAKER RAN INTO TRANSPORTATION DIFFICULTIES, PREVENTING HER FROM COMING 
8thEarthDay

Creating a partnership between traditional cultures and scientific innovation is possible and beneficial to the planet, says an environmental biologist who will speak at Indiana State University in observance of Earth Day.

Robin Kimmerer, professor of environmental biology at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, is the founding director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, which aims to create programs drawing on the wisdom of both indigenous populations and scientific knowledge for shared goals of sustainability.

 “I believe that environmental science and traditional knowledge can be symbiotic in nature, where the strengths and limitations of each knowledge system are balanced by the other,” Kimmerer said. “For example, the scientific method necessarily separates the observer and the observed, attempts to be strictly objective, rational and reductionist. Science engages the human powers of intellect, but explicitly excludes the other ways that humans have of understanding the world.

“Many of the questions of sustainability that we face involve the intersection between human culture and values and the natural world,” she added. “So relying on a single knowledge system, which excludes human values, is inadequate to address the challenges we face. Traditional knowledge is more holistic and includes values, ethics and responsibilities … so makes a good partner to balance scientific ways of knowing.”

Source: Tribune-Star – read entire article