What to do first? Ideas for getting acquainted with your ISU Library.

While the ISU Library is, by official standards, a good medium-sized library, for many new students, it is by far the largest library they have come into contact with. Some students may not have had a school library/media center or a school media specialist or an enlightened classroom teacher to guide them in using library resources before they came to college. For many international students, just the fact that our library collections are open to them [they don’t have to ask for an item but can go to the stacks and get it themselves] is a new experience. There is the physical library and the virtual library. We have 2 million books and numerous non-print and online items. How to start sorting it all out? First, just spend some time in the Library — in our comfy chairs, in the Cup and Chaucer Cafe, coming to a live or TV event in our Events area. Find your favorite quiet or out-of-the-way place to study when you need to leave your home or residence hall or meet a study group. Try it, you’ll like it!

For a more organized approach, download our new list, Library Readiness for Research & Recreation, print off a copy, and work your way through the items there. Make a connection with a librarian. Check out a book!

Marsha Miller, Reference/Instruction Librarian

Welcome!

Welcome to all the new and returning students.  Be sure to check in with the library blog for news and features about the ISU Library.  The blog has been a little slow since its start back in the spring, but I hope that we will be able to keep it hopping this year.  2008-2009 will be a very interesting year at the library.  It will start off with Extravaganza on September 4 (more on that later).  As the year goes on, we will be making some major changes to the library.  We have already started on the main floor (see the posts about the moves below).

Again, keep checking back, or set up a RSS feed to get updates delivered directly to you.

Anthony Kaiser–Head of Reference/Instruction

Move Updates

If you were on the main floor this week, you probably had to contend with the noise of our moves.  The major work is complete on the main floor.  The Writing Center is now located at the northeast corner of the main floor across from the DVD and CD collection.  The Browsing Books area has moved to the northwest corner of the main floor.  Current Periodicals have been shifted over beside the reference collection.  Current newspapers are temporarily over in the Events Area.  They should be moved to their new location next week.  Check out some photos of the move in the right hand column.

A Kaiser

We’re Moving Stuff

Microfilm Wagon Train
Microfilm Wagon Train

This week the library staff begins a long process of implementing the recommendations of our Building Committee.  We are going to be making major changes to our collection and floor layout between now and next summer.  The First Floor is getting the initial makeover as the Writing Center and Browsing Books will be relocated.  But first, we have to move some microfilm.

This microfilm archive of newspapers and journals stored in the Reference Section is heading down to the Basement.  Eventually, all microfilm, microfiche, and micro cards will be housed in the Basement. 

Keep checking in for more move updates.

-A Kaiser

Staff Recommended Book

Recommended by Darla Crist-Writing Center Coordinator and Library PR

The Brief History of the Dead/Kevin Brockmeier
PS3602 R63 B75 2006
Short stories turned into novels are often polarized creatures—they either work tremendously well as the short story expands into the form of a book or they fall terribly short of expectations created by the original work. Fortunately, The Brief History of the Dead by Kevin Brockmeier is an example of a short story successfully transformed into an engaging, quirky novel. Readers of Calvino or DeLillo might hear or see a subtle nod or two in those directions, but Brockmeier manages to keep his notion of death—and life after death—as wholly original, with a main character whose story unfolds in interesting patterns and whose fate is unknown until the last few pages. Because of Brockmeier’s ability to weave narrative threads and lives together, the novel becomes a unified and thought-provoking whole with much to say, not only about how we die, but how we live. As an exploration of the power of memory and the mystery of even the most ordinary lives, The Brief History of the Dead will leave readers wanting more from Kevin Brockmeier.