Open Temporary Part-time Staff Position in the Library: Art Collection Assistant

The library posted a part time, no benefits staff position to the ISU hiring site, working with Jocelyn Krueger in the Permanent Art Collection. The position title is Art Collection Assistant – Part Time, No Benefits. The posting is active and electronic applications will be accepted until July 5, 2019.

Position description excerpts:

Work 28 hours weekly, between 8:00AM and 5:00PM, Monday through Friday.

The Permanent Art Collection (PAC) Assistant will be responsible for the maintenance and display of the artwork around campus. They will install and de-install artwork in campus buildings and the public artwork on campus grounds. They will use professional art handling procedures to move, inventory, audit, conserve, clean, exhibit, frame, document, and other actives involving artwork and artwork storage areas. They will help to maintain inventory, condition, and loan reports. They will assist various campus employees, researchers, and vendors access the art collection while maintaining its safety and security, ensuring its accessibility into the future. They will perform these duties in assistance to the Curator and be solely responsible in their performance in the curator’s absence.

For a complete position description, including qualifications, see http://jobs.indstate.edu/postings/28163

Qualified individuals may apply for this position by submitting an online application, cover letter and reference contact information.

Library Irises in Bloom

This is the blooming time of year. Near the library you’ll find several iris beds. The original beds were planted just outside the south [emergency] door of the Library by Kathryn Wright, a special collections cataloging librarian. Long gone, her legacy lives on with these iris beds, transplanted to the four corners just south of the Library portico.

Another librarian, Barbara Keller (also deceased) worked with ISU to get the plaque. 

Library will digitize St. Theodore Guerin’s works

The Digital Initiatives Unit of the Indiana State University’s library’s Special Collections Department received a $15,453 grant to help the Sisters of Providence of Saint Mary-of-the-Woods Archives provide online access to Saint Mother Theodore Guerin’s letters and journals. 

The project will digitize approximately 1,500 pages of original documents, translations and transcriptions and provide access to the digital representations through Indiana Memory and the Digital Public Library of America. The master digital files will be stored long term in the MetaArchive Digital Preservation Network.

This is an opportunity for the ISU library digital initiatives staff to share their expertise with community organizations,” said Cinda May, librarian and chair of Special Collections at Indiana State. “We’re working to include English translations along with the French text to make the letters and journals of Mother Theodore Guerin available to a worldwide audience.”

This project is supported by the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the Indiana State Library.

The letters and journals provide a variety of insights into the culture and history of 19th century America, especially in Indiana. In 1840, Mother Guerin and five companions traveled from Ruillé, France, to serve the Catholic community in Indiana.

A prolific writer, Mother Guerin kept detailed journals and wrote numerous letters describing the experiences of the French nuns in Indiana’s remote forests. Composed between 1840 and 1856, the 429 letters and three travel journals, written primarily in French with some English translations, are preserved in the Sisters of Providence Archives at Saint Mary-of-the-Woods. Indiana.  State students Kirsten Campbell and Jazmyne Magee were hired to help with the digitization and metadata creation.

“This is good hands-on experience for any history major and it’s always good to know more about how to analyze documents and handle data, which I am doing working about 16 hours a week on this project,” said Campbell, a senior political science and history major from St. Joseph, Ill. “Spending this much time on the project has allowed me to learn a lot about Saint Mary-of-the-Woods, too. I really didn’t know much about the college before I started, especially not its history or founding, and it’s interesting.”

Magee, a sophomore business major from Gary, Ind., travels to the Sisters of Providence Archives to scan and transcribe Mother Guerin’s works.

“I’ve acquired a lot of new skills since I applied to help with this project, like new computer software, how to input and analyze data and even a little of the French language,” she said. “The information I’ve learned is really interesting, too, and I think people will be surprised by all they’ll learn when everything goes live.”

The grant runs through June when the information is expected to be searchable through Indiana Memory and the Digital Public Library of America.

Media contact: Cinda May, librarian chair of Special Collections, Cunningham Memorial Library, Indiana State University, cinda.may@indstate.edu

Article re-posted

April 30 – May 3: HONORS COLLEGE POSTER PRESENTATIONS


GH 401 Research Presentations will be held in the Library Events Area. Come in and view the research. Talk with the student researchers! Enjoy oral presentations as well as poster sessions.

 ~~~~~ Schedule ~~~~~

 Oral Presentations 

(Time) is when the students will present

Session 1, Tuesday April 30, 9:00 AM – 9:50 AM
  • (9:00 AM) Lindsey Cowan, Exercise Science: The Efficacy of Homeopathic Medicine in Adolescents
  • (9:10 AM) David Drummond, Economics: Software Update Available: Using Nonmonetary Incentives to Increase Productivity
  • (9:20 AM) Juan Nysschen, Chemistry: Stereo Electronic Effects in Mechanistic Pathways
  • (9:30 AM) Adam Palmer, Political Science & Legal Studies: Does Crime Rate Have an Impact on Police Force Funding?
  • (9:40 AM) Cecilia Soto, English Teaching: Integrating Young Adult Literature into the Secondary Classroom​

Session 2, Tuesday April 30, 2:00 PM – 3:20 PM
  • (2:00 PM) Allison Crick, Accounting & Marketing: Investigation of Employee Preference Based Typology for Adaptive Leadership
  • (2:10 PM) Olamiposi Famuditimi, Economics: The World’s Superpower: Will the United States continue to lead or will the mantel be passed to China
  • (2:20 PM) Ope Famuditimi, Communication: Female Vampires and Werewolves in Cinema
  • (2:30 PM) John Myles Hesse, English & Theater: Queer Eye for the Playwright: The Otherness of Queer Playwrights
  • (2:40 PM) Kush Patel, Anthropology: Processed Foods and the Obesity Epidemic
  • (2:50 PM) Shantel Rodgers, Recreation and Sports Management: Sex, Gender, and Sport: Fighting Back Against Inequality
  • (3:00 PM) Garrett Short, Communication: Pressure on the Press: An Analysis of the Adversity Modern Media Faces
  • (3:10 PM) Takoda Sons, Biology: Personalized Medicine: A Review of Current Literature

Poster Presentations

Session 1, Wednesday May 1, 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
  • Cassie Bice-Dunmoyer, Social Work: The United States Criminal Justice System: Punishment or Rehabilitation?
  • Helena Bierly, Earth and Environmental Science: A Catalyst for a New Climate Conversation: Analyzing Climate Variability and Agricultural Yield in the Midwest
  • Sarah Ewigleben, Criminology: Dancing To Be Thin: Study of Eating Disorders in the Dance World
  • Julia Linton, Accounting: Eliminating Single Use Plastic Packaging in America: Operational and Environmental Impacts
  • Taylor Mann, Baccalaureate Nursing: Common Concerns With Vaccinations: Why We Need Them
  • Aaron Meyer, Aviation Management: Rules Written in Blood
  • Kylee Moody, Biology: The Many Faces of Abortion: Protecting Women and Future Generations
  • Sarah Parker, Health Sciences: The Keto Diet: Is it Healthy and Safe for the Human Body?
  • Julie Schubert, English Teaching: The Effects of Varied Censorship Forms in Educational Settings
  • Shelby Small, Elementary Education: Why Public Schools are Switching to Uniforms

Session 2, Wednesday May 1, 12:30 PM – 2:30 PM
  • Rebecca Bettridge, Art—Graphic Design: Individualism in Art: Exploring the Influence of Art History on Current Visual Creations
  • Kade Carter, Mechanical Engineering Technology: Addressing the Skills Gap in Manufacturing
  • Chandler Hoskins, Chemistry: Irreversible Enzyme Inhibitor: Penicillin Blocks the Bacterial Cell Wall
  • Arika Kemp, Chemistry: The Chemical Aspect of Vaccination
  • Bansari Modhera, Biology: Benzodiazepines: Abuse, Addiction & Gender Differences
  • Cierra Natt, Biology: A Survey of the Implications of Leadership Methods
  • Samantha Paloma, Baccalaureate Nursing: Violence in the Workplace: A Nurse’s View
  • Emily Rogers, Recreation and Sport Management: Putting the Brakes on Sex Trafficking in the United States
  • Evan Rogers, Insurance and Risk Management: Artificial Intelligence: The Future of Our Everyday Lives
  • Brooke Schafer, Elementary Education: School Safety: How a Safe School Affects a Child’s Education
  • Braelyn Wence, Speech-Language Pathology: The Effects of Dance on the Human Body and Mind
Session 3, Wednesday May 1, 2:30 PM – 4:30 PM
  • Laura Cochran, Biology: Gene Regulation in Heart Development in Pluripotent Stem Cells
  • Sierra Gale, Science Education: The Benefits that the Arts Bring to the Science Classroom
  • Tyler King, English & Psychology: The Impact of Cognition on Linguistic Development and Rehabilitation
  • Nathaniel Koehler, Marketing: Marketing Data: Whose Information is it?
  • Robert Pawlak, Athletic Training: Worth of Athletic Training Services Provided by a Division 1 Collegiate Basketball Athletic Trainer and Athletic Training Student
  • Briana Sheehy, Baccalaureate Nursing & Language Studies: The Undeniable Truth: Substance Abuse within the Nursing Profession
  • Claire Silcox, Communication: The Correlation Between Changes in Women’s Fashion Trends and Women’s Societal Roles
  • Ryan Stenger, Marketing: Major League Marketing: An Analysis of an MLB Franchise’s Potential in Indianapolis
  • Joseph Twitdy, Psychology: The Foundation of Empathy: Mirror Neurons and Their Implications
  • Phillip Williams, Mechanical Engineering Technology: Alternative Fuel Solutions for Transportation

Session 4, Thursday May 2, 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
  • Ashley Angulo, Mechanical Engineering Technology: Women in STEM: The Journey of Intellectual Women, Rate of Women in the Workforce, and Upping the Numbers
  • Liam Brown, Chemistry: Animations of Electron Rearrangement in Pericyclic Reactions
  • Courtney Ferguson, Insurance & Risk Management—Finance: How Natural Catastrophes Impact the Insurance Industry
  • Kristal Garcia, Civil Engineering: OSHA Regulations and the Safety of Construction Workers on Jobsites
  • Karli Hall, General Studies: Understanding the Complexities of Food Allergies
  • Elizabeth Hobbs, Elementary Education: Chronic Absenteeism in the American Classroom
  • Gabrielle Horrall, Exercise Science: Sensory Processing Disorder: Perception of Sensations and Lack of Integration
  • Hillary Johnson, Geology: Tracking an Invasive Diatom in the Greater Mississippi River Basin through Space and Time
  • McKenna Jones, English Education: The Dark Tower Looms: An Investigation of Literary Connections in Stephen King’s Magnum Opus
  • Priyadharshini Manikandan, Biology: Feminine Hygiene Products: A Lack of Accessibility and Education
  • Maren Milbourn, Baccalaureate Nursing: The Detrimental Effects of Mental Health:  Understanding The Intricate Details of Anxiety and Major Depression and Its Effects on Various Aspects of a Person’s Life
  • Noah Runyon, Athletic Training—Applied Medicine: Solutions to the Opioid Epidemic
  • Haylee Sigmon, Operations and Supply Chain Management: Evaluating How Companies React to Environmental Disasters
  • Emily Taylor, Human Development and Family Studies: A Critical Analysis of Holocaust Education

Session 5, Thursday May 2, 2:00 PM – 4:00
  • Brandon Ball, Management: The Effects of Colors in Marketing
  • Seth Biggs, Business Management: The Automotive Buying Process: Past and Present
  • Katherine Forness, Health Science: Minding the Gap: Investigating Pay Equity and Gender Discrimination
  • Kelsie Gee, Language Studies—Spanish Teaching: The Effectiveness of TPRS in Foreign Language Classrooms
  • Bailey Goff, Speech—Language Pathology: Benefits of Equine Therapy On Mental Illnesses: An Alternative To Traditional Treatment In Rural Communities
  • Nathan Guth, Safety Management: An Examination of American Politics and Economics in the Absence of Adolf Hitler
  • Sydney Hamker, Criminology: The Effects of Concussions in Athletes
  • Madison Henry, Marketing: Successful Practices of the Walt Disney World Company
  • Caroline Ann Kinderthain, English: Unraveling Consensual Non Monogamy
  • Mateo Nino, Psychology: The Effects of Media on the Mental Health Profession
  • Josie Rakes, Accounting & Financial Services: Social Media Use and Social Conformity: Investigating the effects on Millennials and Generation Z

Session 6, Friday May 3, 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM
  • Sarah Ahmer, Fine Art: How College Builds Key Skills for Employment (With a Focus on Art Students)
  • Alathia Bowden, Social Work: Anxiety and Depression: The Effects on Students
  • Kyle Collins, Finance—Insurance: Solving Climate Change: The Value of the Stock Market
  • Logan Dawson, Health Administration: Videogames: The Impact on Society
  • Jacob Harmon, Mechanical Engineering Technology: An Analysis of the History and Design of Umbrellas
  • Emma Hayward, Elementary Education: STEM Education at the Elementary Level
  • Makayla Herring, Insurance and Risk Management: Financial Literacy and Independence: The Need for Educational Reform
  • Jacob Kissick, Insurance and Risk Management—Financial Services: Drones in the Insurance Industry: Implications, Use, and Affects
  • Tanner Mead, Computer Science: The Electronic Controversy: How Video Games Affect Your Health
  • Shannon O’Connor, Accounting: Breaking the Stereotype: The Media’s Influence on the Fraternity and Sorority Community
  • Whitney Peters, Biology: The Limits of Empathy: Critical Analysis of Compassion Fatigue Among Nursing Healthcare Professionals
  • Emma Walker, Anthropology & History: Two-Spirited Native American peoples: Who They Are and How They Help Us Understand Native American Culture

Session 7, Friday May 3, 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
  • Kaitlyn Booker, Business Education: Impact of Differentiated Teaching Instruction
  • Gretchen Burkhart, Finance: Can Likability Be Learned?
  • Caleb Dosch, Economics: How Did the Golden Age Capitalism Occur and was it Worth it?
  • David Green, Information Technology: Artificial Intelligence and its Implications
  • Kaleb Guess, Marketing: Recruitment and Development in Motorsports: iRacing Service as an Alternative to Traditional Recruitment, Training, and Practice
  • Karlyn Hart, Criminology: Serial Killers: Born or Made?
  • Kaitlyn Malek, Biology—Pre-Med: Radial Artery versus Saphenous Vein for Coronary Artery Bypass Procedure
  • Bryanna Mathews, Biology: Sediment and Water Quality Determination of the Otter Creek Watershed, Indiana
  • Austin Montgomery, Athletic Training—Clinical: Glenohumeral Internal Rotational Deficit and its Effects on a Pitcher’s Body
  • Payton Nemeth, Recreation and Sports Management—Recreation Therapy: Genealogy’s Impact on Daily Life
  • Madison Robinson, Elementary Education: The Effects of Poverty on Children
  • Haley Viewegh, Baccalaureate Nursing: Patient Violence Against Nurses: The Impact on Staffing Retention and Hospital Liability

Photo credit: students in images from previous Honors College poster sessions, photographer Marsha Miller, Library Marketing Committee

April 25: Bash Lectures in Modern American Literature: Megan Marshall

James and Virginia Bash Lectures in Modern American Literature: Megan Marshall

The lecture series welcomes Megan Marshall, Charles Wesley Emerson College professor, to present “My Elizabeths: Confessions of a Serial Biographer” at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 25 in Root Hall, A-264.

She is the author of Margaret Fuller, for which she won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize, and of The Peabody Sisters, which won the Francis Parkman Prize and the Mark Lynton History Prize.