LARRY BIRD SPOTTED ON LIBRARY’S 3RD FLOOR!

Larry Bird – as far as the eye can see!

A 13-case display of Larry Bird’s golden years at Indiana State University is now on display. In addition to photographs and magazines held by Archives, the exhibit is enhanced with personal memorabilia, including buttons, tickets and tee-shirts – are on loan from Al Perone. Al (’81 GR ’84) is known to everyone on the ISU campus. Currently he is serving as Assistant Director, Indiana State University Alumni Association in the Division of University Advancement.


Al on Larry: Being a student at Indiana State during the Larry Bird Era hooked me into Sycamore sports.  I was always a sports fan in HS, but when I came to ISU we were on the National stage.  When we made it to the Final Four in Salt Lake City Utah, there was no doubt in my mind that I wanted to be there!   A week later and 33 hours in the back seat of a Datsun B210, I was there.  I was able to witness “The Game that Made the Game.”    I feel very fortunate to be one of the few students in the world that was able to watch, in person, their school play for the National Title in Basketball!  Since then I’ve traveled over 50,000 miles watching Sycamore Teams play across the United States.  Go Trees!


 

September 26: Hispanic Heritage Month: Poetry makerspace

Poem creation that involves the use of magnetic poetry kits in English and Spanish, typewriter poetry, interactive listening station English and Spanish, blackout poetry using pages from the English and Spanish books.

The event is open to all with the aim to create a space for creation, discovery of the literary person within and a place for inspiration for poetry.

Drop in anytime between 5pm and 7pm > Library Events Area

September 11, 10am – 2pm Student Research Exposium – 33 posters!

Celebrate summer undergraduate research.  Nearly 70 students from all across ISU have been conducting research during summer 2019.  On September 11, from 10am to 2pm, that work will be displayed in the Library Events Area. Posters (and maybe some art) will be available all day and authors and creators will be there for an hour throughout the day.   Come see what summer research our students conducted.  It’s worth it!  Plus, we will have an audience favorite competition – So remember to vote and tell your friends! 

SCHEDULE OF AUTHORS, POSTER TITLES AND ABSTRACTS

10-11am

TEJAS KANDHARKAR: A SCREEN TO IDENTIFY TARGETS OF THE FORKHEAD/FOX PROTEIN JUMU THAT MEDIATE CARDIAC PROGENITOR CELL DIVISION

Forkhead (Fkh/Fox) transcription factors (TFs) mediate multiple cardiogenic processes in both mammals and Drosophila. Our prior work has shown that the Drosophila Fkh gene jumeau (jumu) mediates three distinct categories of cardiac progenitor cell division—asymmetric, symmetric, and cell division at an earlier stage. However, the significant enrichment of Fkh TF binding sites in the enhancers of cardiac genes suggests that jumu may be utilizing additional downstream target genes to regulate cardiac progenitor cell division. To assess their potential cardiogenic role, we have started phenotypic analysis of a prioritized subset of Jumu-regulated candidate genes using amorphic or hypomorphic alleles. Of these genes, several have shown cardiac progenitor cell division defects, attributing them as potential elements of cardiogenesis.

MIRIAN ALVAREZ-DUBON:    HIGH-THROUGHPUT GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF IN VITRO AND INVIVO MAMMALIAN CARDIOGENESIS IDENTIFIES COMMON DEVELOPMENTAL GENE EXPRESSION SIGNATURES

The development of the embryonic heart requires the step-wise activation of a complex gene regulatory network that guides the specification and differentiation of pluripotent cells to cells of the heart.  Published high-throughput gene expression data sets of mouse embryonic heart development and human in vitro cardiomyocyte differentiation provides us the opportunity to investigate important biological processes.  We have identified early developmental and early cardiac gene expression signatures that are shared between the two experimental systems: the mouse heart and in vitro cardiomyocyte differentiation.  Using our CarDGEA (Cardiac Development Gene Expression Analysis) tool, we have created early embryonic and early cardiac gene lists that comprehensively identify gene expression during the early stages of cardiomyocyte differentiation.

We are helping our collaborators identify and quantify alkaloids from the skin secretions of poison dart frogs using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Gas chromatography separates compounds in the gas phase. Mass spectrometry ionizes molecules and measures the mass to charge ratio of the resulting ions. We use electron impact to produce fragments and use the pattern to identify alkaloid classes.  We then use chemical ionization to confirm our molecular weight from the [M+H]+ ion. Once we confirm the identity of the alkaloid, we use the integration for the most abundant ion to quantify and report the data to our collaborators.

MYKENZIE KOSTA & CLAIRE SUM:  SEARCH FOR STREPTOCOCCAL GENES LINKING C-DI-AMP AND SPEB EXPRESSION THROUGH TRANSPOSON MUTAGENESIS

A significant virulence factor of Streptococcus pyogenes, a human pathogenic bacterium, is the secreted protease SpeB. It was recently discovered that cyclic di-AMP, the second messenger in S. pyogenes, regulates SpeB expression. Without DacA or Pde2, the c-di-AMP synthase and a hydrolase respectively, SpeB is not expressed. In this study, we search for genes that mediate c-di-AMP and SpeB expression by performing transposon mutagenesis. The DacA or Pde2 mutant was electroporated to introduce the pMGC58 plasmid carrying the TnΩKm2 transposon. Colonies displaying the wild-type protease activity were collected. The transposon-inserted genes in the chromosomes will be identified by sequencing. The long-term goal of this research is to determine how the genes regulate SpeB expression.

LYNDSEY MOORE: COMPARISON OF SENSATION AND POSTURAL CONTROL BETWEEN REPEATED SELF-MWMS WITH MOVEMENT AND JOINT MOBILIZATIONS IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC ANKLE INSTABILITY

Those with chronic ankle instability (CAI) suffer from motion, strength, balance, and plantar cutaneous sensation (PCS) impairments. Joint mobilizations have demonstrated efficacy in the improvement of motion within this population, but little research exists regarding their effects on PCS and static balance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of self-mobilizations and clinician-mobilizations on PCS and static balance. Six individuals with CAI participated in a two-week intervention of a prescribed joint mobilization condition. Before and after they completed the intervention, PCS and eyes-open and eyes-closed balance testing were completed. Results indicated that no changes occurred in PCS (p>0.266) or eyes-open balance (p>0.174). Some eyes-closed balance changes (p<0.031) were identified for each group that warrant further investigation.

GREGORY DODD: “Q DEEP LEARNING IMPLEMENTATION ON A SINGLE MACHINE ENVIRONMENT”

Artificial intelligence (A.I.) has had many advances within the world of technology in the last decade. A.I. can now be built and implemented all on a single, basic machine. That is exactly what this research set out to do. A simple A.I. was built and given a Q Learning module to test if having an A.I. learn a task on a basic machine was viable. The second aspect of our research was to test the A.I.’s learning rate. Our team then bench-marked and adjusted the A.I to streamline its learning to the quickest possible rate we could achieve on a basic machine.

COURTNEY NUYEN:        COPPER-CATALYZED SILYLATIONS OF ALDEHYDES

In organic synthesis, carbon nucleophiles serve as useful tools that can be added to various functional groups to build molecular complexity. Organosilanes represent unique carbon nucleophiles because of their high selectivity and mild reactivity. Currently, the most efficient methods for developing organosilanes utilize expensive heavy-metal catalysts like platinum and palladium and silylboranes that are expensive and air/water sensitive. Our methodology, alternatively, uses a copper metal catalyst and disilane silicon source. This research aims to develop catalytic silylations of aldehydes to produce the corresponding α-silyl alcohols. Attempts to characterize the product revealed the presence of a competing transformation, the Brook Rearrangement. A less electron-deficient disilane may decrease the likelihood of the Brook rearrangement and favor formation of the α-silyl alcohol.

JARET POSZ:        ACCESSIBLE SYNTHESIS OF ORGANOFLUOROSILICATES

Organotrifluoroborate salts have enjoyed substantial success over the past several years. This is, in part, due to their easy synthesis, high reactivity, and benchtop stability. However, the analogous synthesis of organotetrafluorosilicates has not been developed. The first organofluorosilicates were prepared by treating phenyltriaminosilanes with water-free hydrogen fluoride in ether solution. Several research groups have reported on the synthetically useful electrophilic cleavage reactions of the carbon-silicon bond, however, organfluorosilicates have not received much attention. Here, we present an accessible synthesis of potassium organofluorosilicates. Tetrafluorosilicates are expected to have quite different reactivates when compared to neutral organosilicon compounds. Future work will focus on using organofluorosilicates in varies reactions to produce products with increased value.

CHARLIE FROMM:  PROMOTER ACTIVITY OF COMMUNITY-ASSOCIATED METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS USA300_1759

Community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA MRSA) strain USA300 is the most common dangerous strain in the US. This research will focus on the hypothetical protein SAUSA 300_1759 that, when tested, caused apoptosis in keratinocytes and other mammalian cells. To further our understanding of the hypothetical protein USA 300_1759, we are studying the promotor activity by cutting out the promoter from a USA 300_1759 knockout and taking GFP from the pJB38 plasmid by polymerase chain reaction. We will ligate them together and insert it into our knockout mutant. As we continue to move forward with research into the promotor of USA 300_1759, it will help us further understand how this toxin helps cause severe, difficult to treat, infections.

PAUL WELLS:         THE EFFECTS OF HYPERPHOSPHORYLATED TAU PROTEINS THROUGH THE BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER USING MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

Tau proteins are proteins that stabilize microtubules that are abundant in neurons. When Tau is hyperphosphorylated, it dissociates from microtubules and aggregates into paired helical filaments (PHFs) which create Neurofibrillary Tangles (NFTs). Tau Neurofibrillary Tangles can be found in the brains of patients with dementia and correlates with Alzheimer’s disease progression. Through the use of Charmm-Gui, Gromacs, and VMD the effects of different isoforms of Tau proteins and the hyperphosphorlation of tau proteins cross the blood brain barrier were researched. It was found that all isoforms of tau can create deformation of Blood Brain Barrier as well as the phosphorylation of tau lowers the pull force needed for the tau protein to move across the Blood Brain Barrier.

11am-noon

JAKE WILKINSON:         COPPER-CATALYZED SYNTHESIS OF ACYLSILANES

Intermediate functional groups are powerful tools in organic synthesis, serving as waypoints to build complexity. Silanes are useful intermediate functional groups because they exhibit mild reactivity and high functional group compatibility. Current methods for synthesizing silanes are expensive and/or air and water sensitive. Our proposed solution to these issues is to use disilanes as the silicon source and copper as the catalyst. This research focuses on the synthesis of acylsilanes while attempting to circumvent toxic, dangerous, and expensive reagents used in current methods. Two methods are proposed: the first involves the oxidation of an α-silyl alcohol and the second involves substitution using a carbonic anhydride. Progress and challenges of these methods will be discussed further.

SARAH WEBSTER:          GENERAL PUBLIC PERCEPTIONS ON THE OPIOID CRISIS

Objective: This study was intended to investigate the perceptions of the opioid crisis among community members and where these perceptions come from. Design: A 23-question survey was given to adults regarding media usage in relation to opioid perception as well as personal experience and opioid knowledge. Setting: Public locations in Jennings County, Indiana. Participants: 208 respondents with an average of 28.2 years lived in Jennings County. Results: In the study, it was also found that the higher the education level, the higher the score on the knowledge quiz. Females scored higher than males on the knowledge quiz. Those who indicated that they did not use a local source to gain information regarding the opioid epidemic, were found to have statistically significant higher knowledge scores. Those with personal attachment to the epidemic, were found to be associated with a statistically higher knowledge score. Overall, the general public’s perception is that opioid abuse is a major problem in Jennings County, but they do not have an outstanding amount of knowledge about opioids as a whole. The perceptions most likely come from traditional media and social media, as well as more personal experiences.

CLAUDIA COZADD:       REVISITING SOIL LEAD SPATIAL VARIABILITY AT AN URBAN COMMUNITY GARDEN

The purpose of this research is to re-assess the ISU Community Garden to evaluate the impact of gardening practices on the distribution of lead in soils. Previous research focused on surface soils only, but this project includes sampling at a depth of 6 inches throughout the garden. The garden was divided into 200 areas. Two soil samples from each area were collected (surface and 6 inches) using a soil auger and analyzed via portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF). Samples were initially analyzed wet after collection and then dried and re-analyzed using pXRF. Initial results have identified areas with elevated soil lead, which will be communicated to the gardeners. Ongoing work includes evaluating lead bioavailability in the collected soil samples.

KYLIE WERTZ:       OPTIMIZING REACTION CONDITIONS FOR SILYLATIONS OF IMINES

Silylamines are useful intermediate groups that may be used in a number of transformations. This research focuses on silylation of imines using an economical copper catalyst and a disiliane as the silicon source. Current methods for synthesizing silanes use silylboranes. However, these are air/water sensitive and expensive. In order to optimize the silylation reaction, several different ligands were used.  The order of addition of reagents, solvent, alcohol additive, and temperature were also altered and formed very little product. Future work will continue exploring different ligands as well as other imine substrates in order to achieve the desired silylamine.

 

RAVIN GAINES:                DETAILED PHOSPHORUS GEOCHEMISTRY ON SEDIMENTS COLLECTED FROM LAKE TANGANYIKA

Lake Tanganyika is the world’s second oldest and the, – deepest- freshwater lake on the planet. This transboundary lake is a vital resource for Tanzania, Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, and Zambia. Future climate scenarios predict that Africa will experience changes in surface temperatures and water resources. To better predict how climate change might affect the natural resources associated with Lake Tanganyika, we can study past intervals of climate change using long lake records. Our purpose is to use detailed phosphorus geochemistry in lake sediments to explore the relationships between productivity, nutrient availability, and climate change. For example, the lake experiences a semiannual shift of wet and dry seasons. We are investigating WHETHER THIS WET-DRY SEASONAL SHIFT MIGHT BE AMPLIFIED BY WET-DRY CLIMATE SIGNALS.

 JACOB RAY, JONATHAN GOODMAN & WYATT HERTEL:                                 

SYSTEMATIC STUDY ON FABRICATING RENEWABLE ENERGY DEVICES BY DEVELOPING UHV RF SPUTTERING SYSTEM

Over the summer our team has developed an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) RF sputtering system that was built to house and for the use of a RF magnetron sputtering system. Initial approaches were made by creating simple dye sensitized solar cells and simplified microchips, such as a diode. Eventually leading to the creation of more complex objects, such as advanced transistors, MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) devices, and photovoltaic devices.

Initially research was done on the assembly, purpose and use of vacuum chambers as well as magnetron sputters. Following that, we worked on designing a set up for the system that would suit our needs. For our purposes we would need a system that could withstand UHV pressures of 10-9 Torr and had to plan our design around that. Once a sufficient understanding of the project was reached, the team split up to focus on the three different sections of the building process, the chamber system, the pump system and the gas system. From there we went about building the system over the duration of the summer.

Based on the knowledge that we had gained by researching what can be created by the magnetron sputters, we fabricated TiO2 dye sensitized solar cells and measured photo-generated current. Furthermore, we engaged in community outreach by educating groups of elementary students from all over Terre Haute school districts about some of the great things that renewable energy technology can achieve. We showed them how to make solar cells by hand, as well has how they worked. In doing so we solidified our knowledge on the subject for when we eventually use the sputter guns to make much more efficient versions of solar panels.

SAMANTHA TRENCH & DAMIA RIZWAN:

 GENE FUNCTION IN HEART DEVELOPMENT can be experimentally investigated through the directed differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into cardiomyocytes. The evolutionarily-conserved zinc-finger transcription factor no ocelli (noc) is required for normal embryonic heart development within the fruit fly. However, the function of the human ortholog, ZNF503, has yet to be investigated in mammalian heart development. We have created three stably-transformed hiPSC lines that express a shRNA directed against ZNF503 thereby reducing gene expression. To determine ZNF503 knockdown efficiency, we have used reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) to identify the ZNF503 shRNA hiPSC line possessing the most robust knockdown; this cell line will be used to study the gene’s function in future experiments.

 

GARRET MAAG & KENDYL GARTON:         CHANGES IN PALEOCEANOGRAPHY AND PALEOCLIMATE IN SOUTH AFRICA: USING ELEMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY OF SEDIMENTS DEPOSITED IN THE MOZAMBIQUE CHANNEL

The Zambezi River has a mean outflow of 3000 m3/s, making it the largest single source of suspended sediment supply to the Mozambique Channel. These sediments provide the opportunity to look at regional changes in paleoceanography and paleoclimate in South Africa over the last 200,000 years, as well as changes to hydrological conditions of the African precipitation belt. The International Ocean Discovery Program drilled in the western Mozambique Channel at site U1477 and recovered approximately 500m of sediment in 1.9 days. We used an X-ray Fluorescence Analyzer to determine elemental geochemistry of the sediments. Next, elemental ratios were used to evaluate changes in the provenance and to evaluate the productivity of the ocean and the South African climate.

DREW RATLIFF:    MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF AMYLOID BETA IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides are formed during improper cleavage from the amyloid precursor protein; these peptides aggregate together to form neurotoxic oligomers and eventually develop into plaques. The Aβ ion channel hypothesis theorizes that oligomers can lead to pore formation in the neuronal membrane; furthermore, this leads to ion imbalance and cell death by apoptosis—I am taking that hypothesis to be axiomatic. My ongoing research is concerned with finding conformations of Aβ likely to be involved in pore formation. I employ GROMACS to simulate Aβ interactions with the neuronal membrane to determine the affinity Aβ has with that membrane. The first portion of my research was replicating simulations showing a strong affinity the amine terminus had to the membrane.

EVELYN MCGUIRE:         A SCREEN TO IDENTIFY TARGETS OF THE FORKHEAD/FOX PROTEIN JUMU THAT MEDIATE CARDIAC PROGENITOR CELL DIVISION

Forkhead (Fkh/Fox) transcription factors (TFs) mediate multiple cardiogenic processes in both mammals and Drosophila. Our prior work has shown that the Drosophila Fkh gene jumeau (jumu) mediates three distinct categories of cardiac progenitor cell division—asymmetric, symmetric, and cell division at an earlier stage. However, the significant enrichment of Fkh TF binding sites in the enhancers of cardiac genes suggests that jumu may be utilizing additional downstream target genes to regulate cardiac progenitor cell division. To assess their potential cardiogenic role, we have started phenotypic analysis of a prioritized subset of Jumu-regulated candidate genes using amorphic or hypomorphic alleles. Of these genes, several have shown cardiac progenitor cell division defects, attributing them as potential elements of cardiogenesis.

 

HILARY HOWARD, BLAKE BANTLE, ADDISON BLAYDES, CLAUDIA COZADD, & KATYA DRAKE:   THE HETEROGENEITY OF THE UNDERLYING VEGETATION INCREASES ARTHROPODA DIVERSITY

We analyzed the diversity of pollinators and their habitats at four locations with varying age in organic production. We expected to find a higher biodiversity where organic practices were used longer. The sites included the ISU community garden, a conventional agricultural site, White Violet Center’s organic farm, and a pollinator habitat. Observations of arthropoda and plants were recorded through iNaturalist by five observers for three days each week for atleast two hours for twenty-four days. Biodiversity for arthropoda was calculated using Shannon’s index. The community garden had the highest arthropoda biodiversity, followed by the organic farm, then pollinator habitat, and the conventional agriculture site having the least. The heterogeneity of plants at a site increased the biodiversity.

CYNTHIA RAMAZANI:  DIFFERENTIAL ANALYSIS OF THE METABOLOME AND MICROBIOME IN THE MURINE COLON

 Recent studies have detected significant differences in microbiota profiles in the three different segments of the murine colon: the proximal colon (PC), the medial colon (MC), and the distal colon (DC). Other studies have also highlighted the importance of assessing samples that contain the tumors, which may reflect more closely the microbiome environment of the tumor than commonly assessed fecal samples. We examined the microbiome and metabolome composition across the three anatomical locations of the colon of female C57BL/6N mice to further examine differences of microbes and metabolites by colonic location (PC, MC, and DC). These mice were fed a control diet (C), an energy-restricted diet (E), or a high-fat diet (H) diet from 3-21 weeks, injected with azoxymethane (a colon cancer inducer) between 16-21 weeks, and switched to one of the three above-mentioned diets from 21-60 weeks. Principle components analyses (PCA) of these samples before and after normalization reveal clear differences in metabolite abundances between colonic location. Significantly altered metabolites across different locations were subsequently determined by ANOVA (p-value < 0.05 and log2 fold change >= 1.5). Further investigations will consist in an analysis of the microbiome data and an evaluation of the correlation between microbe-metabolite pairs.

Noon-1pm

AHMAD AHMAD:    COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF THE DISSOCIATION OF CYCLOHEXANOL USING NATURAL BOND ORBITAL ANALYSIS

We are interested in using natural bond orbital (NBO) methods to predict the dissociation pathways that are responsible for the distribution of radical cation fragments and intensities in mass spectra.  In this project we use high-level computational chemistry methods to examine the fragmentation of cyclohexanol, C6H5OH.  Features of the reaction energy profile, including numerous equilibrium structures and several transition states, are reported.  Natural resonance theory (NRT) analysis of the equilibrium structures reveals significantly diminished bond orders for the bonds that homolytically cleave during fragmentation.  These bonds are compromised when beta (spin-down electron) bonding density delocalizes into a vicinal “hole” that is left when an electron is ejected from the parent molecule

HANNAH VELDHUIZEN:          MICROPLASTICS INGESTED BY FRESHWATER PLANKTIVORES IN THE WABASH RIVER FROM 1963-2010

Microplastics are abundant in many freshwater ecosystems, and the ingestion of microplastics has been reported in 600 aquatic taxa. Although present-day microplastic ingestion is well known, little is known about its historical record. Our work seeks to investigate the abundance of microplastics in several species of fish collected from the Wabash River from 1963 to 2010. Twenty-nine fish stomach samples were examined under a stereo microscope and categorized using type, color, shape, and size. Results show that various types of microplastics are present within the digestive tracts of Wabash River fish species, including fish collected in the 1960’s. On average, 7.4 (± 4.6) microplastics per fish were found, and the most abundant microplastic type ingested was microfibers (80%).

WYATT HERTEL:   SYSTEMATIC STUDY ON FABRICATING RENEWABLE ENERGY DEVICES BY DEVELOPING UHV RF SPUTTERING SYSTEM

Over the summer our team has developed an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) RF sputtering system that was built to house and for the use of a RF magnetron sputtering system. Initial approaches were made by creating simple dye sensitized solar cells and simplified microchips, such as a diode. Eventually leading to the creation of more complex objects, such as advanced transistors, MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor) devices, and photovoltaic devices.

Initially research was done on the assembly, purpose and use of vacuum chambers as well as magnetron sputters. Following that, we worked on designing a set up for the system that would suit our needs. For our purposes we would need a system that could withstand UHV pressures of 10-9 Torr and had to plan our design around that. Once a sufficient understanding of the project was reached, the team split up to focus on the three different sections of the building process, the chamber system, the pump system and the gas system. From there we went about building the system over the duration of the summer.

Based on the knowledge that we had gained by researching what can be created by the magnetron sputters, we fabricated TiO2 dye sensitized solar cells and measured photo-generated current. Furthermore, we engaged in community outreach by educating groups of elementary students from all over Terre Haute school districts about some of the great things that renewable energy technology can achieve. We showed them how to make solar cells by hand, as well has how they worked. In doing so we solidified our knowledge on the subject for when we eventually use the sputter guns to make much more efficient versions of solar panels.

ISHMEET KAUR:   HIGH-THROUGHPUT GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF IN VITRO AND  IN VIVO  MAMMALIAN  CARDIOGENESIS  IDENTIFIES  COMMON  DEVELOPMENTAL GENE EXPRESSION SIGNATURES

The development of the embryonic heart requires the step-wise activation of a complex gene regulatory network that guides the specification and differentiation of pluripotent cells to cells of the heart.  Published high-throughput gene expression data sets of mouse embryonic heart development and human in vitro cardiomyocyte differentiation provides us the opportunity to investigate important biological processes.  We have identified early developmental and early cardiac gene expression signatures that are shared between the two experimental systems: the mouse heart and in vitro cardiomyocyte differentiation.  Using our CarDGEA (Cardiac Development Gene Expression Analysis) tool, we have created early embryonic and early cardiac gene lists that comprehensively identify gene expression during the early stages of cardiomyocyte differentiation.

1pm-2pm

 MARCUS VOGES:  TERRITORIAL BOUNDARIES TEND TO INCREASE COMFORT.

Previous research has indicated that those in the military with clear boundaries tended to get along better. However, this was contradicted in another study in college dorms which found the opposite true. The goal of this study was to determine if college students tended to view others more favorably when there are clear boundaries as opposed to not having boundaries. Participants drew as many symbols as they could that represented personal connections to ISU on a shared table with a confederate with varied boundary conditions and then rated the confederate. While respondents showed no difference in perceptions of the confederate as a function of the boundaries, participants may have created one by leaving space between their drawings and the confederate’s.

BRYAN WALKER:            THE ROLE OF ELECTRICAL INTERACTION AND CHARGE TRANSFER IN COINAGE METAL-CARBENE COMPLEXES

We use computational chemistry methods with natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis to examine the influence of electrical (electrostatic and polarization) interactions and charge transfer on the stabilities of metal-carbene complexes.  Carbenes are formally hypovalent compounds that are electron deficient at one carbon atom.  Carbenes form strongly bound, by 40-80 kcal/mol, organometallic complexes.  We focus attention on heterocyclic carbenes and examine how the dissociation energies of the metal-carbene complexes depend on (i) the identity of the metal atom (Cu, Ag, Au), (ii) the identity of the halide bound to the metal atom (Cl, Br), (iii) the identity of the heteroatoms (N, P, As) in the cyclic carbene, and (iv) the influence of ring saturation.

SKYLER GILLMAN:          ANALYSIS OF FRACTION ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION WORD PROBLEMS IN ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS TEXTBOOKS

Although many factors affect students’ learning of fractions, curriculum materials play a vital role in shaping students’ experiences with fractions. Currently, little is known about how U.S. elementary standards-based and conventional textbooks address and develop the meanings of fraction addition and subtraction. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine how fraction addition and subtraction is presented in Saxon Mathematics and Everyday Mathematics. More specifically, this study will contribute to our understanding of (1) the frequency of fraction addition and subtraction word problems, (2) the levels of cognitive demands related to fraction addition and subtraction tasks, and (3) the meanings of fraction addition and subtraction word problems provided by the Saxon Mathematics and Everyday Mathematics curriculum materials.

KATYA DRAKE:    REVISITING SOIL LEAD SPATIAL VARIABILITY AT AN URBAN COMMUNITY GARDEN

The purpose of this research is to re-assess the ISU Community Garden to evaluate the impact of gardening practices on the distribution of lead in soils. Previous research focused on surface soils only, but this project includes sampling at a depth of 6 inches throughout the garden. The garden was divided into 200 areas. Two soil samples from each area were collected (surface and 6 inches) using a soil auger and analyzed via portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF). Samples were initially analyzed wet after collection and then dried and re-analyzed using pXRF. Initial results have identified areas with elevated soil lead, which will be communicated to the gardeners. Ongoing work includes evaluating lead bioavailability in the collected soil samples.

JOHN REIMONDO:              A PROPOSED METHOD FOR JCAP PROGRAM EVALUATION

This poster is documentation of the work and research conducted at a local Health Department for a summer undergraduate research program, or RICOH. Direct, clinical, or hands-on research was unable to be run, like originally planned, but significant strides were made in developing a program evaluation method for the Montgomery County Jail Chemical Addictions Program. This paper begins with analysis of academic papers and published studies of programs and jail therapeutic communities across the nation, discussion of Method followed, Results and Discussion pieces, and a call to action to why the proposed program evaluation should be pursued.

BRYCE CURREY:            ELECTROCATALYSIS

Electrochemistry has been a well-developed branch of science since the 1800’s. Being that it is simply the study of electron transfers, nearly all chemists will come across it in redox reactions. This field has been revived by cutting-edge testing equipment and emerging demand in alternative renewable energy sources. With this revival, we approach our research with our state-of-the-art potentiostat and paired rotating electrode setup. With this setup we can run a multitude of voltammetry measurements along with durability tests for hydrogen evolution reaction catalysts. It should be noted however, our work is simply a foundational stepping stone for our future work on things such as discovery new catalytic compounds, and in-depth kinetics studies

MATTHEW SINER: MAKING PHYSICS TOYS

A new one semester physics undergraduate laboratory course introducing students to the design and programming of an Arduino programmable microcontroller has been designed.  Several laboratory projects were designed and tested to teach students to assemble and operate different components and sensors, in addition to writing the programs.  The course culminates in a multi-week solar panel project.  Data is presented from a test run of this culminating project.  It requires students to mount a solar panel and write the necessary code to retrieve data from it.  This data will be from three methods of solar tracking: static, timed, and tracking. They will then interpret their data to reach a conclusion on the best method.

ALEXANDER HARRIS:    THE RURAL VERSUS URBAN OPIOID TREATMENT IDEOLOGIES OF A SOUTHERN INDIANA COUNTY

Using an in-person online survey and top down question approach, this study sought to answer whether or not there is a correlation between a persons’ sociogeographic status and their preferred opioid use disorder treatment method. Participants were asked several questions including their age, sex, sociogeographic area, preferred opioid use disorder treatment method, position on funding for opioid use disorder treatment, and whether or not the participant knew someone with opioid use disorder. Asked to choose between rural, suburban, and urban sociogeographic categories, participants in all three category said they wanted “whatever [treatment] is most effective” to be more widely available.

MICHAEL BENNETT:       TWO SCRIPTS FOR MAPPING AND MUTATION TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR BINDING SITES TO STUDY GENE REGULATION

 Enhancers are stretches of DNA that are recognized and bound by particular combinations of sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factors (TFs) to regulate the cell-specific or tissue-specific expression of enhancer-associated genes.  Utilizing known binding affinities to all possible 8-mer DNA sequences for specific TFs obtained from protein binding microarrays (PBMs), we designed a script to map potential TF binding sites in any given enhancer.  We developed a second script using PBM data that suggested alternative sequences that these TF binding sites could be mutated into to prevent TF binding.  These scripts facilitate the construction of appropriate transgenic enhancer-reporter constructs to empirically examine the effects of TF binding on enhancer activity, thereby enhancing our understanding of transcriptional regulation and gene regulatory networks.

 

 

 

Another Summertime Library Staff and Retiree Luncheon

On Wednesday, August 7, Library staff and retirees were treated to a buffet luncheon in the Library Events Area.

(1) David Vancil (retiree, Special Collections); Wilma Turetzky (retiree, Reference)
(2) In view: several  library student assistants, Christi Burt (Admin), Sheila Gregg (Technical Services/Government Documents)
(3) David Vancil (retiree, Special Collections); Jenny Martin (retiree spouse); Gene Norman (retiree, Reference); Mary Ann Phillips (Technical Services)
(4) In view: Nancy Watkins (retiree, Interlibrary Loan, previously Library Instruction & Orientation); Penny Kyker (Government Documents); Wilma Turetzky (retiree, Reference): Lorene Modesitt (Technical Services)
(5) Anna Miller (Systems); Andrew Swearingen (Acquisitions), Adam Bahus (student assistant); Rolland McGiverin (Research & Instruction); Valentine Muyumba (Technical Services)
(6) Shelley Arvin (Research & Instruction); David Del Colletti (spouse of our most recent retiree, Barb Austin – Public Services); Christi Burt (Admin); Deb Taylor (Technical Services)
(7) Front table: Deb Considine (Technical Services); student assistant; Sheila Gregg (Tech Services/Gov Docs); 3 student assistants. At the far table you can glimpse: Cheryl Blevens (Research & Instruction); Kathy Gaul (retiree, Reference); Susan Frey (Systems/Scholarly Communication); and our soon-to-be retiree, Cinda May (Special Collections)
(8) Kathy Gaul (retiree, Reference); Susan Frey (Technical Services/Scholarly Communication); Cinda May (soon to retire from Special Collections): Cheryl Blevens (Research & Instruction)
(9) Tim Crumrin (Dean’s spouse & historian); Katherine Black (Circulation); Cheyenne Bealmear (student assistant); Rhonda Beecroft (Systems)
(10) At front table: David Vancil (retiree, Special Collections); Dara Middleton (Library Events Coordinator); Jenny Martin (spouse of Ron Martin, retiree, Associate Dean); Gene Norman (retiree, Reference); Dean Robin Crumrin; Mary Ann Phillips (retiree, Technical Services)
(11) Erin Harmon (Public Relations/Admin); Holli Moseman (Interlibrary Loan); Abby Wright (Systems); Ali Moorhead (Admin); Melissa Gustafson (Systems)
(12) Brylynn Ellis (Circulation); Beverly Grubb (Admin); Steve Hardin (Research & Instruction)
(13) Front table: Nancy Watkins (retiree, Interlibrary Loan; Library Instruction & Orientation); Penny Kyker (retiree, Government Documents); Ken Turetzky, son of retiree Wilma Turetzky, Reference); Lorene Modesitt (retiree, Technical Services); Brian Bunnett (Public Services)