JOB OPENING: Library Resource Sharing Associate & Copy Cataloger – Floater

Position closes June 14th so do not delay applying!  LINK

Library Resource Sharing Associate & Copy Cataloger – Assists in all phases of the Interlibrary Loan Unit and Special Collections. Includes

  • use of specialized software,
  • customer service, billing,
  • manual searches of the library collection, and
  • use of standard office equipment including scanners and fax machine.
  • Responsible for the appropriate sorting, distribution, and packaging of all Interlibrary Loan and Statewide Remote Circulation System incoming and outgoing mail.
  • Implements and maintains procedures and policies.
  • Ensures quality library services and resolves related problems.
  • Serves as the Resource Sharing Associate and Copy Cataloger and participates in the supervision of student assistants.

Participates in goal setting and planning objectives. Possesses good interpersonal skills, including tact, courtesy and civility in accordance with the Library’s mission, vision and values. Position requires a working knowledge of: ILLiad, Sierra, OCLC, ALA ILL Code, lending policies of other libraries, copyright laws, billing management software and Microsoft Office programs.

 

Women’s History Month Colloquium 2021: A virtual memory book

Cunningham Memorial Library’s Events Area is usually the venue for the annual Women’s History Month Colloquium (from Gender Studies and other sponsors)  and the Library shares photos of those events. With this year’s virtual Colloquium, Marsha Miller, Research and Instruction Librarian and member of the Library’s Marketing team, was able to attend all but one of the events and did screen-grabs to represent and record the event for posterity. Those, along with some of the graphic announcements, are shared here. Don’t forget to check out the 4 blog entries on Women and American Health Policy.

Debra Israel [l]; Katrina Babb [l]

 

Allison Duerk [l]; Lisa Phillips [r]
Kate Metzel Debs Photo on Display in the House

note: Dalton Veach did not present

Upper: Corey Vail; Katrina Babb
Lower: Ruth Fairbanks; John McGlone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When Ruth Fairbanks’ computer gave up, she socially distanced with her next door office neighbor, Amanda Lubold {top image}

Via Zoom chat, Marsha Miller contributed the titles of books related to the film and the discussion, available in the ISU Library:

  • e-book: The technology of orgasm : “hysteria,” the vibrator, and women’s sexual satisfaction [1999]
  • A natural history of sex : the ecology and evolution of mating behavior – print QL761 .F67 2001
  • ebook: Regulating desire : from the virtuous maiden to the purity princess
  • Browsing Collection (1st Floor) Sex and the constitution : sex, religion, and law from America’s origins to the twenty-first century
  • ebook: Sexuality and slavery: reclaiming intimate histories in the Americas
  • ebook: Sexual intimacy for women : a guide for same-sex couples
  • The joy of gay sex HQ76 .S533 2006
  • available at Vigo County Public Library: The clitoral truth : about pleasure, orgasm, female ejaculation, the G-spot, and masturbation

 

 

 

 

 

 

April: National Poetry Month – guest blog entry with Amy Ash

Dr. Amy Ash is Assistant Professor of English and Director of Creative Writing in ISU’s Department of English

She has contributed this Library blog entry especially in celebration of National Poetry Month!

Scroll down for information on the Thursday, April 8 Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series appearance of internationally-acclaimed poet and essayist Aimee Nezhukumatathil.

At the inauguration of President Biden this January, Amanda Gorman reminded our nation of our love for poetry. Her inaugural poem was so powerful, so perfect for the moment. Afterward, social media exploded with the beauty, the energy of her poem and her performance.

As a poet, I’ve always known the magic, the power a poem can offer. As a teacher, I love to introduce students to the world of contemporary poetry that is very much alive and thriving. This is an exciting time—the 25th anniversary of National Poetry Month, which has grown to become an annual celebration of poetry in schools, in libraries, in statehouses, throughout our streets, and on television and radio programs nationwide.

Jennifer Benka, Executive Director of the Academy of American Poets, reminds us that “poetry has a vital role to play as a counterweight to the struggles we’ve all endured this past year.” I couldn’t agree more. In the darkness and distance of this pandemic, we are continually reminded how essential poetry is in creating community and crafting new possibilities for our world. Though not surprised, exactly, I was still stunned (and so very thankful) by how the poetry community has answered the call for community, as the internet flourished with countless online reading and events throughout the pandemic.

Here at ISU, we are so thankful to be able to continue the Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series this year, offering the experience in a virtual format, which has allowed for unexpected connections and opportunities. The Theodore Dreiser Visiting Writers Series is made possible by grant funding from the Indiana Arts Commission and our regional affiliate, Arts Illiana. We appreciate their continued commitment to and support of the literary arts.

Many thanks also to the Indiana State University College of Arts and Sciences, the Distance Education Program, and the Department of Multidisciplinary Studies for their generous support of this series, which offers invaluable community engagement and experiential learning opportunities.

Help us celebrate National Poetry Month this Thursday, April 8th at 6pm by logging in to see internationally-acclaimed poet and essayist Aimee Nezhukumatathil, whose work is infused with discovery, wonder, and joy.

Aimee Nezhukumatathil is the author of a book of nature essays, World of Wonders: In Praise of Fireflies, Whale Sharks, & Other Astonishmentswhich was chosen as Barnes and Noble’s Book of the Year, and four award-winning poetry collections, most recently, Oceanic (2018). Awards for her writing include fellowships from the Mississippi Arts Council, Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Award for poetry, National Endowment of the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Her writing has appeared in NYTimes Magazine, ESPN, and Best American Poetry. She is professor of English and Creative Writing in the University of Mississippi’s MFA program.

 ~~~~ ZOOM REGISTRATION LINK ~~~~

 

 

American Health Policy Research Project – Blog series (4 of 4)

American Health Policy Research Project

This special topic history course {HIST 313} looked at rules, regulations, policies and governmental functions and practices meant to reduce disease, promote health or to allow or promote the delivery of medical care. Students examined both public health policies and also policies that affect the provision of medical care, with a goal of understanding how the various complicated structures (physical, legal, political and professional) that the United States built in the past shape the American system of Health Care today. Each project relates to American health policies as they relate to women, as the presentations will be made available as part of Gender Studies’ Women’s History Month Colloquium events.

Each blog entry features posters created by the students. They are presented in the Library blog as a virtual poster session since in-person events are precluded under the strictures of Covid-19.

Teacher: Dr. Ruth Fairbanks {History Department; Gender Studies within the Multidisciplinary Studies Department}

The Better Baby Movement – 1 by Lisa Girard
The Better Baby Movement – 2 by Lisa Girard

 

 

Women in Clinical Trials by Lauren Jacob
Maternal Mortality and Racial Disparities by Shae Brinkley
California Pure Milk Bill by Emma Natalie                                                                                                          

American Health Policy Research Project- Blog series (3 of 4)

American Health Policy Research Project

This special topic history course {HIST 313} looked at rules, regulations, policies and governmental functions and practices meant to reduce disease, promote health or to allow or promote the delivery of medical care. Students examined both public health policies and also policies that affect the provision of medical care, with a goal of understanding how the various complicated structures (physical, legal, political and professional) that the United States built in the past shape the American system of Health Care today. Each project relates to American health policies as they relate to women, as the presentations will be made available as part of Gender Studies’ Women’s History Month Colloquium events.

Each blog entry features posters created by the students. They are presented in the Library blog as a virtual poster session since in-person events are precluded under the strictures of Covid-19.

Teacher: Dr. Ruth Fairbanks {History Department; Gender Studies within the Multidisciplinary Studies Department}

Sterilization Laws and State Policies by Delisha Dixon
Voluntary Sterilization by Angela Pohlen
Roe v. Wade by Jordan Zeller
Violence Against Women Act by Kacey Titzer