Review: Wolfsbane and Mistletoe

When a busy academic librarian actually finishes a book, I think it’s important to annotate it in some way. Hmm, how about a review via our blog? So, do you like to read short stories? By a variety of authors? With a general theme of horror? Mixed in with Christmas? How do you feel about werewolves? Well have I got a book for you! WOLFSBANE AND MISTLETOE; subtitled, ‘hair-raising holiday tales’, currently located in Browsing PS 648 .W37 W65 2008. Editors Charlaine Harris and Toni L. P. Kelner have put together a 2nd-themed book that was more of a delight to read than I imagined. The collection of original stories fill the need for whatever werewolf ‘canon’ you like, and then some – do you like your weres to only change during the full moon? To have control of when and how they change? Do you like them working in full disclosure or hidden away and trying to blend in? There is not a bad story in the group; there was one towards the end that I initially didn’t like the direction it seemed to be headed for, but then I read a little more, and a little more, and of course, it didn’t go where I thought it was at all. Many of the writers have written in the mystery, thriller or horror genre and none of them were overly familiar to me, but they all did a great job! As always, check our online catalog for availability.

What to do first? Ideas for getting acquainted with your ISU Library.

While the ISU Library is, by official standards, a good medium-sized library, for many new students, it is by far the largest library they have come into contact with. Some students may not have had a school library/media center or a school media specialist or an enlightened classroom teacher to guide them in using library resources before they came to college. For many international students, just the fact that our library collections are open to them [they don’t have to ask for an item but can go to the stacks and get it themselves] is a new experience. There is the physical library and the virtual library. We have 2 million books and numerous non-print and online items. How to start sorting it all out? First, just spend some time in the Library — in our comfy chairs, in the Cup and Chaucer Cafe, coming to a live or TV event in our Events area. Find your favorite quiet or out-of-the-way place to study when you need to leave your home or residence hall or meet a study group. Try it, you’ll like it!

For a more organized approach, download our new list, Library Readiness for Research & Recreation, print off a copy, and work your way through the items there. Make a connection with a librarian. Check out a book!

Marsha Miller, Reference/Instruction Librarian